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Chapter 6
Operations

This chapter reviews the food service, transportation, facilities and security of operations Venus Independent School District (VISD) in the following sections:

  1. Food Service
  2. Transportation
  3. Facilities Use and Maintenance
  4. Safety and Security


B. TRANSPORTATION

The primary goal of every school district transportation department is to transport students to and from school and approved extracurricular functions in a timely, safe and efficient manner.

The Texas Education Code (TEC) authorizes, but does not require, each Texas school district to provide transportation between home and school; from school to career and technology training locations; to co-curricular activities; and to extracurricular activities. The federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requires a school district to provide transportation for students with disabilities if the district also provides transportation for the general student population or if disabled students require transportation to receive special education services.

The TEC also states that a school district may receive state funding for transporting regular and special program students between home and school and for transporting career and technology (CATE) program students to training locations. The Legislature sets transportation funding rules; TEA administers the program. TEA requires each eligible school district to provide two annual school transportation reports—the Route Service Report and the Operations Report. The Route Service Report documents reimbursable miles traveled and the number of riders by program and subprogram. The Operations Report assigns all costs and miles to either regular or special programs.

Texas limits state transportation funding for regular program transportation to students living two or more miles from the school they attend unless the students face hazardous walking conditions on the way to school. Although the term “hazardous” is up to the district to define, TEA guidelines suggest that areas with few or no sidewalks, busy roadways or railroad tracks would qualify as hazardous.

All 1,871 VISD students are eligible to ride buses to and from school. Due to the narrow streets and lack of sidewalks within the Venus city limits, the district lists all routes within the city as hazardous. The district’s Transportation Department serves the entire district of 35.3 square miles with 41 bus routes. Exhibit 6-17 lists the characteristics of each of the district’s bus routes.

Exhibit 6-17
VISD Bus Route Characteristics
2001-02

Route Number Type of Route* Daily Mileage Bus Number Bus Capacity Average Daily Ridership Daily Percent of Used Bus Capacity
1 R 34.4 19 71 64 90%
2 R 35.6 13 71 71 100%
3 R 37.8 22 71 57 80%
4 R 25.4 24 71 71 100%
5 R 40.6 25 71 71 100%
6 R 40.6 20 71 58 82%
7 R 35.2 11 71 71 100%
8 R 34 10 71 71 100%
9 R 37.4 3 71 71 100%
10 R 35.2 4 71 70 99%
11 R 33.6 12 71 66 93%
12 R 34 1 71 71 100%
13 R 22.8 21 71 71 100%
14 R 24.2 8 71 66 93%
15 R 34.4 2 71 58 82%
16 R 14 14 71 65 92%
17 R 40.0 7 71 68 96%
18 R 27.0 6 71 71 100%
19 R 44.6 16 71 53 75%
20 R 31.0 9 71 32 45%
30 R 25.6 16 71 16 23%
31 R 21.0 12 71 22 31%
32 R 26.2 43 19 14 74%
33 R 20.6 42 71 24 34%
34 R 23.4 12 71 20 28%
35 R 20.1 49 71 19 28%
41 C 42.0 17 65 12 18%
42 C 42.0 49 19 6 9%
43 S 46.0 42 35 ** **
44 C 24.9 46 19 ** **
45 C 29.6 48 19 ** **
47 S 41.3 46 19 ** **
50 S 57.8 41 35 8 23%
51 S 48.0 46 19 7 37%
52 S 47.2 45 24 7 29%
53 S 39.8 50 19 7 37%
54 S 21.2 20 71 ** **
55 S 91.2 43 19 ** **
60 A 129.2 47 19 19 100%
61 A 54.3 47 19 9 47%
63 P 24.6 41 35 ** **

Source: VISD, Average Daily Ridership, 2001-02; VISD, Vehicle List, March 4, 2003.
*Type of Routes: R-Regular, S-Special Education, C-Career and Technology, A-Alternative Education and P-Parenting.
**Fewer than five students.

According to the Texas Association of School Business Officials, the industry standard for buses transporting all grade levels is 75 percent capacity. Exhibit 6-18 shows used bus capacity of the VISD bus fleet for the various types of routes. Exhibit 6-19 shows annual miles and trends for VISD and peer districts.

Exhibit 6-18
VISD Used Bus Capacity
2001-02

Type of Route Percent of Used Bus Capacity
Regular 79%
Special Education 17%
Career and Technology 9%
Alternative Education 74%
VISD Average Use 65%

Source: VISD, Average Daily Ridership, 2001-02; VISD Vehicle List, March 4, 2003.

Exhibit 6-19
Annual Mileage Totals and Trends
VISD and Peer Districts
1997-98 through 2001-02

District 1997-98 1998-99 1999-2000 2000-01 2001-02 Average for the five years Average change per year
Dublin 121,152 124,912 117,316 113,436 113,629 118,089 (1,505)
Regular 110,880 110,880 110,880 110,880 110,264 110,757 (123)
Special 10,272 14,032 6,436 2,556 3,365 7,332 (1,381)
C & T* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Private 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Godley 59,004 65,808 72,386 82,440 85,860 73,100 5,371
Regular 59,004 65,808 73,386 82,440 85,860 73,100 5,371
Special 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
C & T* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Private 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Grandview 271,763 283,435 304,908 304,753 298,420 292,655 5,331
Regular 47,844 47,844 47,844 47,844 47,844 47,844 0
Special** 220,267 234,226 252,067 254,613 247,424 241,719 5,431
C & T* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Private 3,652 1,365 4,997 2,296 3,152 3,092 (100)
Rio Vista 68,400 83,787 75,932 69,956 72,450 74,105 810
Regular 51,480 63,357 58,172 52,740 53,748 55,899 454
Special 16,920 20,430 17,760 17,216 18,702 18,206 356
C & T* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Private 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Venus 193,513 194,039 215,357 224,069 234,156 212,148 8,128
Regular 134,854 138,848 157,284 165,186 146,436 148,522 2,316
Special 19,940 19,224 18,577 31,844 44,492 26,736 4,910
C & T* 37,719 35,967 39,496 27,039 43,228 36,890 902
Private 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Peer Average 130,080 139,485 142,636 142,646 142,590 139,487 2,502
Regular 67,302 71,972 72,321 73,476 74,429 71,900 1,425
Special 61,865 67,172 69,066 68,596 67,373 66,814 1,102
C & T* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Private 913 341 1,249 574 788 773 (25)

Source: TEA, School Transportation Route Services Reports, 1997-98 through 2001-02.
*C & T: Career and Technology
**Grandview ISD transports all special education students for the other four districts in the Co-op except for VISD.

The review team divided VISD’s average annual mileage increase (8,128 miles per year) by the average annual mileage increase of its peer districts (2,502 miles per year) and multiplied the result by 100 to calculate that VISD’s average annual mileage increase is 325 percent greater than its peer districts. This is due primarily to VISD’s growth in the Special Program mileage—446 percent greater than that of its peer districts—and the growth in the Regular Program mileage—163 percent greater than its peer districts.

For regular program mileage, the state uses linear density to calculate district reimbursements for qualifying transportation expenses. TEA calculates linear density by dividing a district’s annual ridership by the annual mileage. TEA established standard allotments per mile based on the linear density. Average ridership is the average number of students transported on buses each day, on either the morning or afternoon route. Mileage is the total miles the buses drive over the course of an entire day. Standard miles and riders do not include miles or riders for alternative, bilingual, desegregation, magnet, parenting, regular pre-kindergarten or hazardous area service. TEA uses the linear density ratio to assign each school district to one of seven reimbursement groups. Each group is eligible to receive a maximum allotment per mile. TEA bases the allotment rates on the previous year’s linear density.

Exhibit 6-20 shows the TEA linear density groups and the related allotment per mile.

Exhibit 6-20
TEA Linear Density Groups
For Regular Program Mileage Reimbursements

Linear Density Allotment Per Mile
2.40 and above $1.43
1.65 to 2.40 $1.25
1.15 to 1.65 $1.11
0.90 to 1.15 $0.97
0.65 to 0.90 $0.88
0.40 to 0.65 $0.79
Up to 0.40 $0.68

Source: TEA, Handbook on School Transportation Allotments, revised June 2002.

Linear density is calculated by dividing the annual ridership by the annual mileage. TEA established standard allotments per mile based on the linear density. Exhibit 6-21 shows VISD’s and peer districts’ linear densities. Its peer districts, which have lower linear densities, serve larger geographic areas with a less dense student population.

Exhibit 6-21
VISD and Peer Districts
Linear Density
2001-02

District Linear Density
Dublin 0.439
Godley 1.214
Grandview 0.982
Rio Vista 0.904
Peer Average 0.886
Venus 1.902

Source: TEA, School Transportation Route Services Reports, 2001-02.

Exhibit 6-22 shows that the total daily ridership in three of the peer districts is decreasing; Grandview ISD is the only peer district that has increasing total daily ridership. Grandview ISD’s total daily ridership has increased 38 percent from 1997-98 to 2001-02. During the same time, VISD’s total daily ridership increased 43 percent. Increased student use of school busing programs is causing the mileage increase in VISD. The increased participation of students in the transportation program is the result of the district’s increasing student enrollment.

Exhibit 6-22
Total Daily Ridership Trends
VISD and Peer Districts
1997-98 through 2001-02

District 1997-98 1998-99 1999-2000 2000-01 2001-02 Trend 1997-98 through 2001-02 Percent Change 1997-98 through 2001-02
Dublin 381 388 367 352 275 (106) (28%)
Regular 371 375 354 344 269 (102) (27%)
Special 10 13 13 8 6 (4) (40%)
C & T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%
Private 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%
Godley 711 821 945 534 579 (132) (19%)
Regular 711 821 945 534 579 (132) (19%)
Special 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%
C & T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%
Private 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%
Grandview 336 357 365 447 462 126 38%
Regular 278 272 246 236 261 (17) (6%)
Special 57 84 117 208 198 141 247%
C & T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%
Private 1 1 2 3 3 2 100%
Rio Vista 369 347 275 273 274 (95) (26%)
Regular 361 335 264 265 270 (91) (25%)
Special 8 12 11 8 4 (4) (50%)
C & T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%
Private 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%
Venus 976 1,027 1,374 1,428 1,391 415 43%
Regular 940 988 1,332 1,375 1,325 385 41%
Special 21 17 27 35 43 22 105%
C & T 15 22 15 18 23 8 53%
Private 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%
Peer Average 449 478 488 402 398 (52) (12%)
Regular 430 451 452 345 345 (86) (20%)
Special 19 27 35 56 52 33 174%
C & T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%
Private 0 0 1 1 1 1  

Source: TEA, School Transportation Route Services Reports, 1997-98 through 2001-02.

Transportation in VISD is the responsibility of the director of Operations, Maintenance and Transportation. The mechanic is the only district position that is entirely devoted to transportation. The mechanic position maintains the district’s fleet, is a full-time bus driver and helps call substitute drivers. Exhibit 6-23 shows how VISD organizes its transportation operations.

Exhibit 6-23
VISD Transportation Operations Organization
2002-03



Source: VISD, Transportation Department.

Most of the district’s bus drivers are members of the VISD teaching or administrative staffs. Only eight individuals have bus driving as their sole duty within the school district. The district requires coaches and organizational sponsors to be certified bus drivers and drive for field trips and extracurricular activities. The district has 48 certified bus drivers and another five employees awaiting certification. The district usually needs substitute drivers every day.

New bus drivers receive five hours of training. VISD requires drivers to take an annual refresher training that covers all updates in laws, requirements and procedures. Drivers receive in-service days for the training.

The VISD Transportation Department maintains 43 vehicles; 36 of the district’s vehicles are buses with various passenger capacities. Exhibit 6-24 describes the passenger capacity of the district’s fleet. VISD also owns five pick-up trucks, a sedan it uses for administrative purposes and an enclosed bed truck.

Exhibit 6-24
VISD Vehicle Types
2002-03

Buses Other
Capacity Number of Buses Type Number of Vehicles
19 5 Pick-up truck 5
24 1 Cargo truck 1
35 1 Sedan 1
71 29 Total 7
  36 Grand Total 43

Source: VISD, Vehicles Inventory.

Each school has its own special education bus. Of the five 19-passenger buses, two are for special education. One serves the elementary school, and the other serves the middle school. The 24-passenger bus serves the special education needs of the primary school, and the 35-passenger bus serves the special education needs of the high school.


FINDING

VISD has only one full-time mechanic to care for 43 vehicles. In addition to his mechanic duties, he also drives a bus, helps contact substitute drivers, fuels the buses and keeps a log of fuel usage. The mechanic and director of Operations, Maintenance and Transportation also are on call to make emergency vehicle repairs. These additional duties reduce the amount of time the mechanic can actually spend on vehicle maintenance.

Most of the buses are still covered by warranties for major repair and replacement items. For the buses out of warranty, the district makes any needed repairs in-house, when possible. To accomplish this, the district maintains a stock of common preventive maintenance items. The district contracts outside mechanics for any required repairs that cannot be made at the bus maintenance facility. This requires the mechanic take the bus to the repair facility if another driver is not available.

Industry standards typically recommend between 20 and 30 buses per mechanic, depending on the fleet mix and the number of miles each bus is operating. VISD’s vehicle to mechanic ratio exceeds the industry standard by a factor of two.

Recommendation 45:

Assign the mechanic to full-time mechanical duties.


IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES AND TIMELINE

1. The director of Operations, Maintenance and Transportation lists all duties and functions currently performed by the mechanic. September 2003
2. The director of Operations, Maintenance and Transportation reassigns all non-maintenance duties currently performed by the mechanic to other employees. October 2003


FISCAL IMPACT

This recommendation can be implemented with existing resources.


FINDING

VISD does not have a bus replacement plan. The district purchases buses without considering the long-term budget effects of the purchases.

Exhibit 6-25 describes the age of VISD’s bus fleet and compares the district’s fleet with its peer districts. VISD’s bus fleet is relatively young. Most of its 36 buses (64 percent) are less than five years old. Only 8 percent of its buses are more than 10 years old. The peer districts have an average of 26 percent of buses that are more than 10 years old. VISD has a young bus fleet because it purchased several new buses to compensate for the significantly increased ridership it experienced between 1997-98 and 2001-02.

Exhibit 6-25
Bus Fleet Age
VISD and Peer Districts

School District Number of Buses Less Than Five Years Old Number of Buses Five to 10 Years Old Number of Buses More Than 10 Years Old Total Number of Buses Percent of Buses More Than 10 Years Old
Dublin 7 5 4 16 25%
Godley 8 6 0 14 0%
Grandview 5 3 4 12 33%
Rio Vista 3 4 6 13 46%
Venus 23 10 3 36 8%
Peer Average 6 5 4 14 26%

Source: VISD, Vehicle Roster, March 2003 and TEA, School Transportation Operation Reports.

These buses are 1999 models through 2003 models. Exhibit 6-26 shows that VISD did not evenly space the purchase of the buses from 1999 through 2003. Bus purchases ranged from a low of none in 2003 to a high of nine in 2001. This uneven distribution of bus purchases will place an uneven cost burden on the district if all buses of the same model year need to be replaced at approximately the same time.

Exhibit 6-26
Purchase Cost of VISD Buses
Five Years Old or Less
1998-99 through 2002-03

Purchase Year Number of Buses Purchased Total Cost
1998-99 4 $159,604
1999-2000 7 $338,003
2000-01 9 $392,163
2001-02 5 $230,812
2002-03 0 $0

Source: VISD, Vehicle List.

Exhibit 6-27 shows the uneven distribution of the various bus model years for all 36 VISD buses. Because the bus ages are not evenly distributed, the district can expect a large replacement cost to occur as the 2000 model year buses near the end of their useful lives. None of the district’s buses are more than 13 years old. The director of Operations, Maintenance and Transportation said he expects a bus to last 10 years. With proper maintenance, districts can expect their buses to last up to 15 years.

Exhibit 6-27
Model Year Distribution of VISD Bus Fleet
1990-91 through 2002-03



Source: VISD, Vehicle List.

Successful districts replace their buses according to a plan tailored to the district and its transportation needs. The ideal bus replacement plan considers such factors as safety, total vehicle mileage, expected remaining useful vehicle mileage, individual maintenance cost of each bus and the amount of time each bus is out of service for repairs or maintenance.

Recommendation 46:

Develop a 15-year bus replacement schedule for the VISD bus fleet.

The plan should use more than just age for determining a bus’s useful life. VISD should also consider safety, mileage and frequency of repair in its replacement schedule. VISD has a young bus fleet; only three of its buses are more than 10 years old, and those buses are well maintained. The district should not have to replace them within the next five years.

A district can predict the number of buses it will purchase each year by dividing the number of buses the district needs to perform its transportation responsibilities by the expected useful life of its buses. For example, if a district requires 45 buses with an expected useful life of 15 years, the district can expect to purchase three buses per year. Knowing the expected bus purchase schedule allows the district to more accurately forecast expenditures for the coming year and reduces large financial variations in the district’s annual budgets.


IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES AND TIMELINE

1. The director of Operations, Maintenance and Transportation develops a bus replacement plan that includes the measurable criteria the district will use in determining when a bus needs to be replaced. October 2003
2. The director of Operations, Maintenance and Transportation submits the bus replacement plan to the superintendent and business manager for approval. November 2003
3. The superintendent submits the plan to the board for approval. December 2003
4. The district implements the plan. January 2004 and Ongoing


FISCAL IMPACT

This recommendation can be implemented with existing resources.


FINDING

VISD does not allocate student transportation to the proper account code for reporting to TEA as required by TEA’s Financial Accountability System Resource Guide (FASRG). The FASRG requires school districts to account for pupil transportation in Function 34, Pupil Transportation, of the account code matrix. This function should be used only to account for the cost of transporting students to and from school for the regular instructional day. During 2001-02, VISD’s annual mileage was 237,448. Of the total mileage, 209,237 were regular miles used to transport students to and from school. The district used 26,689 miles to transport students to extracurricular and co-curricular activities. The cost of transporting students for class field trips should be recorded in Function 11, Instruction. A review of district transportation records found some Function 11 costs labeled as Function 34 costs and vice versus. The cost of transporting students for co-curricular athletic events should be recorded in Function 36, Extracurricular and Co-curricular Activities. Failure to allocate cost misstates the expenditures of pupil transportation, instruction and co-curricular activities.

A school district may record all bus-related expenditures in Function 34 during the year. However, prior to closing the books for the fiscal year, the district should determine the cost of the different transportation functions and reclassify the transportation expenditures to the appropriate functions.

Exhibit 6-28 provides VISD’s unallocated transportation costs for extracurricular and co-curricular activities from 1997-98 through 2001-02. VISD’s cost-per-mile increase was due to the increased price for fuel and added routes.

Exhibit 6-28
VISD Unallocated Extracurricular and Co-curricular Transportation Costs
1997-98 through 2001-02

School Year Regular Education Extracurricular or Co-curricular Miles Special Education Extracurricular or Co-curricular Miles Regular Cost Per Mile Special Education Cost Per Mile Unallocated Regular Costs Unallocated Special Education Miles
2001-02 26,689 1,112 $2.20 $2.28 $58,716 $2,535
2000-01 28,247 947 $2.09 $1.75 $59,036 $1,657
1999-2000 24,174 1,244 $1.99 $2.14 $48,106 $2,662
1998-99 21,066 1,626 $1.86 $1.97 $39,183 $3,203
1997-98 24,240 2,109 $1.50 $1.08 $36,360 $2,278
Five Year Totals 124,416 7,038 N/A N/A $241,401 $12,335

Source: TEA, School Transportation Operations Reports.

Recommendation 47:

Prepare a year-end audit adjustment to allocate transportation costs to the proper function.

The FASRG provides an example of how to allocate these costs at the end of the year.


IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES AND TIMELINE

1. The business manager prepares a year-end audit adjustment to allocate transportation costs. September 2003
2. The district allocates transportation costs to the proper function. Ongoing


FISCAL IMPACT

This recommendation can be implemented with existing resources.


FINDING

VISD’s transportation costs are higher than its peer districts. The district, unlike the peers, assigns bus monitors to most bus routes. VISD was experiencing a problem with students vandalizing buses. To control the situation, the board asked that the district assign bus monitors to all but in-town bus routes. While it is common practice to use bus monitors on special education routes, most districts do not use the monitors on regular routes because of the cost involved.

VISD pays bus monitors a flat rate of $22 per day during the 175 days students are transported to and from school. Most monitors are VISD employees who perform bus monitoring as an additional duty. The annual pay per person for monitoring is $3,850 ($22 x 175); the district adds this amount as an annual stipend to their other pay. The district has 24 monitors; however, two monitors work only one route per day.

VISD assigns six monitors to cover special education routes; the other monitors work on regular bus routes. VISD’s annual expense for regular monitors is $69,300 ($3,850 x 18). Using monitors on all 63 routes increases VISD’s cost per mile. Exhibit 6-29 compares VISD’s transportation expenditures with those of its peer districts.

Exhibit 6-29
Transportation Expenditures
VISD and Peer Districts
2001-02

School District Total Operating Cost Total Annual Mileage Total Annual Riders Cost Per Mile Cost Per Rider
Dublin
Regular $196,248 162,991 48,420 $1.20 $4.05
Special $13,177 3,384 1,080 $3.89 $12.20
Godley
Regular $246,084 103,211 104,220 $2.38 $2.36
Special $0 0 0 $0.00 $0.00
Grandview
Regular $84,159 86,501 46,980 $0.97 $1.79
Special $289,349 247,729 35,640 $1.17 $8.12
Rio Vista
Regular $178,727 93,641 48,600 $1.91 $3.68
Special $30,211 20,465 720 $1.48 $41.96
Venus
Regular $521,236 237,448 216,000 $2.20 $2.41
Special $148,587 65,106 7,740 $2.28 $19.20
Peer Average
Regular $176,305 111,586 62,055 $1.58 $2.84
Special $83,184 67,895 9,360 $1.23 $8.89

Source: TEA, School Transportation Operation Report and School Transportation Route Services Report, 2001-02.

Dublin ISD and Godley ISD do not use either monitors or video technology. Grandview ISD uses video technology to monitor its buses. Rio Vista ISD has camera boxes in all of its buses and rotates the cameras. However, the district does not run all cameras all of the time. If there are problems on a bus, the district will run the camera.

Brownville ISD uses video cameras to control discipline on buses. The cameras are popular with the drivers because they control student discipline, provide a mechanism for drivers to defend themselves if they are accused of inappropriate behavior and provide proof to principals and parents when a student misbehaves.

New video camera models include options such as external microphones and speed sensors, which districts can use to evaluate driver performance.

Recommendation 48:

Replace regular bus route monitors with a video surveillance system.

Since VISD’s board is concerned about vandalism and student discipline, the district should install video cameras on all buses. This will allow the district to eliminate the stipend it pays the18 regular route bus monitors. The district should continue its use of bus monitors on its special education routes.


IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES AND TIMELINE

1. The superintendent meets with the director of Operations, Maintenance and Transportation and the business manager to draft implementation schedule. August 2003
2. The superintendent presents the implementation schedule to the board. September 2003
3. The board approves the schedule for implementation in the 2003-04 school year. September 2003
4. The superintendent informs employees of the implementation plan. September 2003
5. The business manager orders video cameras and coordinates installation with the director of Operations, Maintenance and Transportation. October 2003
6. The director of Operations, Maintenance and Transportation installs and tests the cameras, and drafts monitoring procedures. December 2003
7. The director of Operation, Maintenance and Transportation trains bus drivers to use the surveillance cameras and the district releases regular route bus monitors. January 2004
8. The district uses the surveillance cameras to monitor discipline, safety and security on the buses. Ongoing


FISCAL IMPACT

A black and white video camera including on-site installation costs $835 per unit. Installing cameras on all of VISD’s 36 buses will cost $30,060 ($835 x 36). The cameras use standard VHS tape with a recording time of eight hours. VISD can purchase replacement tapes with existing funds. VISD pays bus monitors a flat rate of $22 per day for 175 days to transport students to and from school. The annual pay per person for monitoring is $3,850 ($22 x175). VISD’s annual expense for 18 regular monitors is $69,300 ($3,850 x 18). With implementation beginning in spring 2003-04, 85 days would be left to transport students to and from school. The 2003-04 expense for 18 regular monitors is $33,660 (85 days x $22 per day x 18 monitors).

Recommendation 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
Replace regular route bus monitors with a video surveillance system. $33,660 $69,300 $69,300 $69,300 $69,300
Purchase video cameras. ($30,060) $0 $0 $0 $0
Net Savings ($3,600) $69,300 $69,300 $69,300 $69,300