Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts

Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, Glenn Hegar

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100 Percent Disabled Veterans and Surviving Spouses
Frequently Asked Questions

Tax Code Section 11.131 requires an exemption of the total appraised value of homesteads of Texas veterans who received 100 percent compensation from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs due to a 100 percent disability rating or determination of individual unemployability by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

Can this exemption be applied to all properties owned by a veteran who qualifies?

No, this exemption can only be applied to a residence homestead of a disabled veteran.

A disabled veteran who owns property other than a residence homestead may apply for a different disabled veteran’s exemption. This exemption is allowed by Tax Code Section 11.22 and is applied according to the veteran’s disability rating of 10 percent or higher. An eligible disabled veteran may receive both exemptions.

In order to qualify for this exemption, do you have to be receiving a 100 percent disability rating and receiving 100 percent service connected disability compensation?

Yes, a disabled veteran with a service connected disability receiving 100 percent disability compensation and with a disability rating of 100 percent (or determination of individual unemployability) would be eligible for this exemption.

To qualify for this exemption does a veteran have to be both unemployable and have a service connected disability rating of 100 percent?

No, a disabled veteran who has a service connected disability and is receiving 100 percent disability compensation would be eligible for this exemption if he or she is either 100 percent disabled or is unemployable.

When do you have to apply for this exemption?

You must make application to your local appraisal district between January 1 and April 30. You may download and print the Application for Residence Homestead Exemption from the Comptroller’s website.

If you become eligible for the 100 percent disabled veteran residence homestead exemption in the middle of a tax year, does the exemption apply to that tax year?

A person who qualifies for the exemption after January 1 of a tax year may receive the exemption immediately on qualification for the applicable portion of that tax year.

If a 100 percent disabled veteran moves to a different residence homestead in the middle of a tax year, what happens to the exemption on the previous residence?

If an exemption that applied to a residence homestead on Jan. 1 ends during the year, tax is due on the homestead for the portion of the year after the date the exemption ends.

If a 100 percent disabled veteran moves to a different residence homestead in the middle of a tax year, when does the exemption apply to the new residence?

The exemption starts immediately when the 100 percent disabled veteran purchases the new residence homestead. The tax due for that tax year is the amount due for the portion of the year before the exemption started. A residence homestead application must be filed with the appraisal district in which the new residence homestead is located.

Who qualifies for the exemption for the surviving spouse of 100 percent disabled veterans?

Surviving spouses of veterans who qualified for this exemption or who would have qualified for this exemption if it had been in effect at the time of the veteran’s death are eligible if:

  • the surviving spouse has not remarried;
  • the property was the surviving spouse’s residence homestead at the time of the veteran’s death; and
  • the property remains the surviving spouse’s residence homestead.

Does a surviving spouse qualify for an exemption if he or she remarries?

No. A surviving spouse does NOT qualify if the surviving spouse has remarried since the death of the disabled veteran.

How much is the exemption?

The total appraised value of the same property to which the disabled veteran's exemption applied.

If a surviving spouse qualifies for the exemption and then moves to a new residence homestead, can the surviving spouse get an exemption on that homestead?

A surviving spouse can receive an exemption on a subsequent homestead if he or she has not remarried since the death of the disabled veteran; however, the amount of the exemption is the dollar amount of the exemption from taxation of the former homestead in the last year the surviving spouse received the exemption.

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