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Part I:
Property Taxes Statewide

In tax year 2004, 3,748 local taxing units levied almost $31 billion in property taxes, just over 7 percent more than in 2003.

The Texas Constitution authorizes local governments to levy property taxes. Local governments include counties, school districts, cities and special districts such as junior colleges, hospitals, utilities, flood control and emergency service districts.

In each of the state’s 254 counties, a single appraisal district determines the appraised value of taxable property. Local governments, commonly called taxing units, levy property taxes based on the property values set by the county appraisal districts.

Table 1 shows that taxing units by type increased property taxes from 4.4 to almost 9 percent from 2003. School property taxes—imposed by 1,031 independent school districts and representing about 60 percent of total property taxes—totaled about $18.5 billion in 2004. City property taxes increased to exceed $4.6 billion. County property taxes almost exceeded $4.5 billion in 2004. The levy of special districts rose by 9 percent to more than $3 billion, with 52 new special districts levying a property tax.

Table 1 - Property Taxes Reported by Unit Type - 2003 vs. 2004
  Tax Year 2003 Tax Year 2004
Unit Type No. of Units 2003 Tax Levy % Tax Levy No. of Units 2004 Tax Levy % Tax Levy % Increase
School Districts* 1,031 $17,264,153,972 59.8% 1,031 $18,533,964,802 59.8% 7.4%
Cities** 1,029 $4,415,212,819 15.3% 1,034 $4,607,757,531 14.9% 4.4%
Counties 254 $4,121,758,950 14.3% 254 $4,462,844,074 14.4% 8.3%
Special Districts 1,377 $3,092,285,295 10.7% 1,429 $3,369,068,834 10.9% 9.0%
Total 3,702 $28,893,411,036 100.0% 3,748 $30,973,635,241 100.0% 7.2%
*Includes:
County Equalization   $27,559,332     $28,570,338    
South Texas ISD   $10,527,193     $11,734,488    
Totals may not add due to rounding.
** Reflects the number of actual cities rather than reports submitted by the appraisal district.
Source: Carole Keeton Strayhorn, Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, Property Tax Division.


Property Tax Growth

Table 2 shows the growth in property tax levies by the four major types of taxing units since 1985. Comparing tax years 1985 and 2004, the total of all taxing units’ property taxes grew 245 percent.

Table 2 – Growth of the Property Tax by Unit Type, 1985 – 2004
Tax Year Special District
Levy
County Levy City Levy School Levy Total Levy
1985 $1,056,802,000 $1,427,755,000 $1,820,345,000 $4,663,892,000 $8,968,794,000
1986 $1,141,652,000 $1,482,295,000 $1,966,674,000 $5,026,592,000 $9,617,213,000
1987 $1,176,667,000 $1,539,953,000 $2,028,743,000 $5,218,820,000 $9,964,183,000
1988 $1,232,415,000 $1,595,183,000 $2,145,726,000 $5,575,843,000 $10,549,167,000
1989 $1,284,165,144 $1,715,691,860 $2,200,415,156 $6,072,227,279 $11,272,499,439
1990 $1,354,607,273 $1,743,176,612 $2,218,971,749 $6,605,433,619 $11,922,189,253
1991* $1,459,643,501 $1,894,013,461 $2,303,609,801 $7,566,042,099* $13,223,308,862
1992* $1,492,043,534 $1,996,116,460 $2,311,630,199 $8,181,309,478* $13,981,099,671
1993 $1,535,769,813 $2,176,974,573 $2,362,404,482 $8,681,859,148 $14,757,008,016
1994 $1,620,504,796 $2,311,389,149 $2,493,554,910 $9,024,885,601 $15,450,334,456
1995 $1,628,217,607 $2,391,961,283 $2,596,742,540 $9,340,994,056 $15,957,915,486
1996 $1,698,557,436 $2,537,183,937 $2,701,214,386 $9,910,195,171 $16,847,150,930
1997 $1,759,622,591 $2,658,308,076 $2,847,081,480 $10,394,500,372 $17,659,512,519
1998 $1,889,138,306 $2,828,286,927 $3,005,996,060 $11,334,614,289 $19,058,035,582
1999 $2,041,041,011 $2,979,279,400 $3,247,964,177 $12,009,923,498 $20,278,208,086
2000 $2,389,110,312 $3,200,919,731 $3,530,863,516 $13,392,336,012 $22,513,229,571
2001 $2,703,512,059 $3,566,857,130 $3,884,829,249 $15,155,217,587 $25,310,416,025
2002 $2,864,454,984 $3,849,728,346 $4,186,795,363 $16,418,788,831 $27,319,767,524
2003 $3,092,285,295 $4,121,758,950 $4,415,212,819 $17,264,153,972 $28,893,411,036
2004 $3,369,068,834 $4,462,844,074 $4,607,757,531 $18,533,964,802 $30,973,635,241
* 1991 and 1992 include County Education Districts.
Source: Carole Keeton Strayhorn, Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, Property Tax Division.


Property Taxes vs. Other Taxes

When examining how large a role property taxes play compared to other state and local taxes, it is important to remember that different collection cycles exist. Figure A reflects 2003 property taxes of $29 billion, which local governments spent in calendar year 2004, versus state and other local taxes collected and spent in fiscal 2004, which ended August 31, 2004. Table 3 compares fiscal 2003, which ended August 31, 2003, versus fiscal 2004.

Pie Chart

Major state and local sales taxes and property taxes in 2004 totaled more than $61 billion. Property taxes remained the single largest type of tax at almost 47 percent of this total.

State sales taxes, the next largest revenue source at $15 billion, represented 25 percent of the total. When combined with other state taxes, such as motor fuels and motor vehicle taxes, the franchise tax, oil and gas severance taxes, mixed beverage and cigarette tax and all other taxes, the state’s share of the total tax levy is about 45.3 percent.

Local city and county sales taxes, along with metropolitan transit authority (MTA) taxes, were almost 8 percent of the total.

Table 3: State and Local Sales and Property Taxes as a Percentage of Total Major Taxes
Type of Tax Tax Amount for Fiscal 2003* Percent of Total Tax Amount for Fiscal 2004** Percent of Total
Property Tax $27,319,767,524 47.6% $28,893,411,036 46.89%
State Sales Tax $14,277,286,162 24.9% $15,417,156,258 25.02%
Other State Taxes $11,849,389,262 20.7% $12,495,845,387 20.28%
Local Sales Taxes*** $3,914,416,742 6.8% $4,810,225,605 7.81%
Total Taxes $57,360,859,690 100.0% $61,616,638,286 100.00%
* Uses the 2003 local property tax levy that local governments spent in fiscal 2004. Includes other local taxes as well as the major state taxes, which were collected and spent in fiscal 2004, ending August 31, 2004.
** Uses the 2004 local property tax levy that local governments spent in fiscal 2005. Includes other local taxes as well as the major state taxes, which were collected and spent in fiscal 2005, ending August 31, 2005.
*** Does not include local utility, hotel/motel, mixed beverage and other taxes.
Source: Carole Keeton Strayhorn, Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, Property Tax Division and the Comptroller's Annual Cash Report.


Tax Rate Rollback Activity

Local voters may limit adopted tax rates, if local taxing units adopt tax rates above their rollback tax rates. Local voters in four of 25 taxing units limited their 2004 adopted tax rate. They were Andrews ISD and Brooks County ISD, Tyler junior college and the city of Bedford.

For the preceding tax year, two out of seven taxing units had to limit their tax rates after elections on their 2003 tax rates.

The rollback tax rate is a calculated maximum rate allowed by law without voter approval. The rollback rate provides the taxing unit with about the same amount of tax revenue it spent the previous year for day-to-day operations, plus an extra 8 percent increase for those operations plus sufficient funds to pay debts in the coming year. For school districts, the extra increase is $0.06 per $100 of property value, rather than 8 percent, based on different calculation steps.

If a local taxing unit other than a school district adopts a tax rate above the rollback rate, local voters may petition for an election to roll back the adopted tax rate to the calculated rollback tax rate.

A school district that adopts a tax rate above the rollback rate must hold a rollback election between 30 and 90 days after the rate is adopted. No petition by citizens is required. The school district’s election differs from other types of units in that voters are asked to ratify their school’s adopted tax rate. If a simple majority of the votes cast in the election favor the adopted tax rate, then the adopted rate stands. If the voters disapprove the adopted rate, the school district’s rollback rate becomes the adopted tax rate. After the outcome of the election, school tax bills are mailed.

Twenty-one independent school districts (ISDs) had voters ratify 2004 tax rates that exceeded their rollback rates. The ISDs where voters approved a higher tax rate are listed in Table 4, which shows the taxing units, with the election date, election results, the adopted tax rate, the rollback tax rate and the percentage the adopted tax rate exceeded the district’s rollback rate. Tax rates are per $100 of value.

Table 5 gives the history of rollback elections since they began in 1982.

Table 4: 2004 Rollback Election Results
Taxing Unit and
Election Date
County Election Results 2004 Tax Rate RBR/% Increase
School District
Andrews ISD
11/2/2004
Andrews Against ratification
Against: 435 - For: 397
1.6486
old rate 1.68787
1.6486/2%
Borden ISD
11/2/2004
Borden Ratified
For: 240 - Against: 53
1.45 1.35/7%
Brooks County ISD Brooks Against ratification
Against: 359 - For: 147
1.2671
old rate 1.542
1.2671/22%
Groom ISD
11/2/2004
Carson Ratified
For: 178 - Against: 71
1.6 1.512/6%
Highland ISD
11/2/2004
Nolan Ratified
For: 71 - Against: 20
1.61 1.40/15%
Hull-Daisetta ISD
11/2/2004
Liberty Ratified
For: 507 - Against: 196
1.5831 1.1941/33%
Jim Hogg ISD
11/2/2004
Jim Hogg Ratified
For: 1058 - Against: 503
1.50245 1.2768/18%
Joaquin ISD
11/2/2004
Shelby Ratified
For: 254 - Against: 236
1.5148 1.0988/38%
Klondike ISD
11/2/2004
Dawson Ratified
For: 84 - Against: 16
1.5 1.36/10%
Lefors ISD
11/2/2004
Gray Ratified
For: 252 - Against: 43
1.6035 1.36/18%
Leon ISD
11/2/2004
Leon Ratified
For: 193 - Against: 58
1.28 1.1019/16%
London ISD
11/20/2004
Nueces Ratified
For: 35 - Against: 3
1.2494 1.048/19%
McCamey ISD
11/2/2004
Upton Ratified
For: 213 - Against: 75
1.5503 1.2783/21%
McLean ISD
11/2/2004
Gray Ratified
For: 216 - Against: 209
1.35 1.17/15%
Meyersville ISD
11/2/2004
Dewitt Ratified
For: 86 - Against: 50
1.5 1.26/19%
North Zulch ISD
11/2/2004
Madison Ratified
For: 165 - Against: 113
1.45 1.45/3%
Pecos Barstow Toyah ISD
11/22/2004
Reeves Ratified
For: 311 - Against: 37
1.5 1.3249/13%
Plains ISD
12/2/2004
Yoakum Ratified
For: 153 - Against: 37
1.5 1.457/3%
Pringle Morse ISD
9/11/2004
Hansford Ratified
For: 50 - Against: 10
1.4 1.12/25%
Santa Gertrudis ISD
11/2/2004
Kleberg Ratified
For: 50 - Against: 10
1.45 1.3089/11%
Taft ISD
11/16/2004
San Patricio Ratified
For: 161 - Against: 107
1.4 1.2001/17%
Westbrook ISD
11/2/2004
Mitchell Ratified
For: 83 - Against: 39
1.45 1.4073/3%
Wink-Loving ISD
11/2/2004
Winkler Ratified
For: 158 - Against: 45
1.5 1.21/24%
Special District
Tyler Junior College
2/5/2005
Smith Election Passed
For: 9,902 - Against: 1,535
0.1271
old rate 0.1623
0.1271/28%
City
Bedford
3/5/2005
Tarrant Election Passed
For: 4,929 - Against: 4,919
0.4007
old rate 0.495
0.4007/24%
Source: Carole Keeton Strayhorn, Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, Property Tax Division.


Table 5: History of Rollback Elections That Passed, 1982 - 2004
Tax Year School Districts Counties Cities Special Districts Total
1982 11 of 24 6 of 6 2 of 3 2 of 2 21 of 35
1983 2 of 4 4 of 4 0 of 1 0 6 of 9
1984 0 of 3 1 of 1 4 of 4 0 of 1 5 of 9
1985 1 of 1 4 of 4 3 of 5 0 8 of 10
1986 2 of 4 2 of 2 2 of 3 1 of 2 7 of 11
1987 2 of 9 1 of 1 3 of 7 3 of 5 9 of 22
1988 4 of 12 3 of 3 4 of 7 1 of 2 12 of 24
1989 10 of 23 4 of 6 6 of 7 1 of 2 21 of 38
1990 6 of 11 3 of 4 2 of 4 3 of 5 14 of 24
1991 1 of 1 2 of 2 2 of 4 1 of 1 6 of 8
1992 0 0 of 1 3 of 3 0 of 1 3 of 5
1993 0 of 3 1 of 2 2 of 2 0 3 of 7
1994 1 of 2 1 of 2 3 of 3 1 of 1 6 of 8
1995 0 of 2 0 1 of 4 0 1 of 6
1996 1 of 3 0 1 of 4 2 of 2 4 of 9
1997 0 0 1 of 1 0 1 of 1
1998 2 of 4 0 2 of 3 0 4 of 7
1999 3 of 11 0 0 of 1 0 of 1 3 of 13
2000 2 of 11 2 of 2 2 of 2 0 of 1 6 of 16
2001 2 of 30 0 of 1 1 of 2 1 of 1 4 of 34
2002 3 of 5 0 of 0 2 of 3 0 of 0 5 of 8
2003 0 of 4 1 of 1 1 of 1 0 of 1 2 of 7
2004 2 of 23 0 1 of 1 1 of 1 4 of 25
Total 55 of 190 35 of 42 48 of 75 17 of 29 155 of 336
Percentage 28.9% 83.3% 64.0% 58.6% 46.1%
Source: Carole Keeton Strayhorn, Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, Property Tax Division.


Freeport Exemption

In 1990, school districts, counties, cities and junior college districts gained the right to choose whether or not to tax freeport property. Tax Code Section 11.251 defines freeport property as goods held in Texas temporarily for up to 175 days for assembling, processing, manufacturing, storage or other purposes.

Texas law was patterned after the federal law on goods coming into U.S. ports and not taxed since they were “free” from a port or tax location. In 1989, the Texas Legislature enacted Tax Code Section 11.251 entitled “Tangible Personal Property Exempt”, which taxpayers and local tax officials refer to it as the freeport exemption.

While the vast majority of school districts, counties, cities and junior college districts continue to tax freeport property, the number of these units that exempt freeport property from taxation increased by 25 taxing units to 322 units in tax year 2004. The amount of value exempted for these taxing units increased by almost $6 billion, or almost 19 percent.

Some junior college districts also exempt freeport property, but the Texas Comptroller’s Property Tax Division does not collect data from these entities for that information. State law requires other special districts, such as water districts or hospital districts, to exempt freeport property.

Table 6 identifies the total exempted value by counties, cities and school districts for the freeport exemption for 2003 and 2004. Table 7 lists the freeport value loss by county, Table 8 lists the freeport loss by city and Table 9 lists the freeport value loss by school district.

Table 6 - Taxing Units That Exempt Freeport Property
Types of Taxing Units That Exempt Freeport Property * 2003 Number of Units 2003 Taxable Value Loss 2004 Number of Units2004 Taxable Value Loss
County 49 $10.1 billion 52 $11.6 billion
City 127 $9.7 billion 139 $11.6 billion
School District 121 $10.8 billion 131 $13.2 billion
Total 297 $30.6 billion 322 $36.4 billion
*State law provided that counties, cities and school districts had a choice to tax or exempt freeport property.
Source: Carole Keeton Strayhorn, Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, Property Tax Division.

Table 7 - 2004 Freeport Value Loss by County
County Freeport Value Loss
Anderson County $15,337,520
Angelina County 33,475,629
Archer County 692,920
Bastrop County 7,420,510
Bexar County 282,438,170
Bosque County 903,030
Brazos County 25,942,544
Burnet County 7,645,184
Coleman County 508,260
Collin County 542,952,749
Comal County 3,641,115
Dallas County 2,196,065,575
Delta County 879,432
Denton County 1,199,346,551
Eastland County 11,046,450
Ector County 40,749,717
El Paso County 1,085,700,398
Foard County 469,460
Gray County 15,491,834
Grayson County 89,157,941
Guadalupe County 120,081,131
Harrison County 74,961,002
Hidalgo County 337,723,356
Hill County 2,533,194
Hutchinson Coun 23,823,810
Kaufman County 61,890,542
Kendall County 8,941,860
Lamar County 70,328,380
Lubbock County 81,108,328
Maverick County 21,808,820
McLennan County 135,189,625
Milam County 24,736,170
Montgomery Coun 107,313,835
Palo Pinto County 11,708,290
Parker County 152,860
Potter County 185,042,906
Randall County 45,380,734
Rockwall County 10,658,736
Runnels County 7,617,860
Rusk County 3,436,100
Smith County 199,877,947
Tarrant County 3,054,824,531
Titus Country 8,046,039
Tom Green Count 36,257,751
Travis County 1,073,606,841
Val Verde Count 43,547,306
Walker County 10,643,257
Webb County 170,524,340
Wharton County 8,305,730
Wichita County 102,223,883
Wise County 12,781,610
Young County 5,550,439
Total (52 Counties) $11,620,492,202
Source: Carole Keeton Strayhorn, Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, Property Tax Division.

Table 8 - 2004 Freeport Value Loss by City
City Freeport Value Loss
Allen $51,747,104
Amarillo 71,813,466
Arlington 261,685,411
Atlanta 6,079,680
Austin 8,864,964
Austin 866,089,926
Azle 1,662,044
Balch Springs 243,704
Ballinger 3,434,370
Bellmead 145,710
Boerne 6,738,300
Borger 238,280
Brookshire 8,223,729
Brownsville 73,139,962
Bryan 12,234,571
Buda 3,062,615
Burkburnett 5,204,320
Canyon 279,500
Carrollton 331,111,356
Cedar Hill 5,868,665
Cedar Park 6,864,044
Clarksville 6,463,630
Clifton 903,030
Clute 92,790
Coleman 508,260
College Station 11,132,211
Converse 2,235,880
Cooper 518,285
Coppell 59,234,518
Corpus Christi 16,591,432
Crowell 469,460
Dallas 854,583,528
Dalworthington 414,170
Decatur 12,781,610
Del Rio 1,989,677
Denison 30,690,697
Denton 148,702,405
Diboll 4,331,460
Eagle Pass 21,296,040
Edinburg 10,158,550
El Paso 1,022,056,204
Euless 3,483,249
Farmers Branch 67,153,875
Farmersville 1,003,262
Forney 18,005
Fort Worth 2,109,998,273
Frisco 8,322,038
Gainesville $ 17,223,443
Galena Park 2,382,210
Galveston 4,709,600
Garland 159,585,225
Georgetown 14,393,621
Graham 3,834,275
Grand Prairie 196,688,974
Grapevine 550,708,856
Haltom City 31,665,744
Harlingen 17,410,970
Haslet 48,770,322
Henderson 3,436,100
Hillsboro 2,390,694
Horizon 2,549,287
Houston 1,248,517,280
Howe 502,410
Huntsville 10,455,080
Kennedale 5,638,726
Kerrville 5,826,662
Lakeway 522,022
Lampasas 2,647,410
Lancaster 28,492,533
Laredo 170,521,360
LaMarque 10,560
League City 6,409,800
Leander 1,552,835
Lewisville 163,076,669
Lindale 6,533,019
Lubbock 62,093,896
Lufkin 13,349,142
Mansfield 58,343,548
Marble Falls 28,362
Marshall 3,216,847
McAllen 168,446,981
McGregor 13,680,220
McKinney 172,280,545
Mesquite 71,699,625
Midlothian 58,978,911
Mineral Wells 21,685,180
Mission 35,250,035
Muenster 73,544
Nacogdoches 19,806,950
New Braunfels 17,181,476
North Richland 4,250,756
Odessa 12,261,213
Palestine 15,050,143
Pampa 903,959
Paris $ 67,287,640
Pearland 18,724,540
Pharr 2,424,841
Plano 247,735,975
Red Oak 322,684
Reno 3,020,740
Richland Hills 5,586,272
Roanoke 165,386,824
Robstown 606,666
Rockwall 10,658,736
Round Rock 58,416,257
Rowlett 1,566,207
Saginaw 32,658,353
San Angelo 25,752,060
San Antonio 270,360,860
San Benito 3,818,187
Sanger 7,605,090
Sansom Park 180,500
Schertz 15,261,795
Seguin 63,674,513
Selma 40,765,878
Shenandoah 305,770
Sherman 55,121,481
Socorro 34,093,252
Southlake 4,816,888
Southmayd 591,729
Stephenville 44,878,624
Taylor 22,847,280
Terrell 57,641,788
The Colony 988,398
Town of Anthony 226,768
Town of Clint 94,500
Town of Flower 302,670,302
Town of Ponder 141,251
Town of Sunnyvale 46,719,349
Tyler 117,704,078
Village of Bee 37,322
Waco 119,232,605
Waxahachie 75,287,223
Weslaco 6,307,253
Wichita Falls 51,539,494
Willis 2,547,114
Winters 4,183,490
Woodway 612,100
Yoakum 18,670
Total (139 cities) $11,565,322,627
Source: Carole Keeton Strayhorn, Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, Property Tax Division.

Table 9 - 2004 Freeport Value Loss by School District (ISD)
School District (ISD) Freeport Value Loss
Alamo Heights ISD $4,025,280
Aldine ISD 399,605,590
Aledo ISD 7,812
Alief ISD 37,448,480
Allen ISD 51,747,104
Amarillo ISD 47,855,521
Archer City ISD 692,920
Arlington ISD 462,470,437
Arp ISD 231,383
Ballinger ISD 3,434,370
Bastrop ISD 7,420,510
Birdville ISD 77,413,264
Boerne ISD 8,941,860
Borger ISD 7,055,800
Bosqueville ISD 2,442,085
Brazosport ISD 198,863,290
Brownsville ISD 86,722,855
Burkburnett ISD 26,890,280
Burnet Cons ISD 6,212,022
Bushland ISD 55,328,311
Canutillo ISD 58,218,548
Canyon ISD 44,809,929
Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISD 522,468,138
Cedar Hill ISD 6,820,906
Chapel Hill ISD 230,843
Chisum ISD 23,019,810
City View ISD 13,141,735
Clint ISD 3,133,278
Coleman ISD 508,260
Cooper ISD 879,432
Coppell ISD 232,735,427
Crowell ISD 469,460
Crowley ISD 16,667,874
Cypress-Fairbanks ISD 687,783,010
Dallas ISD 955,943,347
Deer Park ISD 303,494,880
Denton ISD 148,702,405
DeSoto ISD 1,064,393
Dumas ISD 45,231,420
Eagle Mt.-Saginaw ISD 278,377,325
Eagle Pass ISD 21,808,820
Ector County ISD 52,287,320
El Paso ISD 312,395,747
Evadale ISD 16,808,200
Everman ISD 26,981,934
Fabens ISD 13,271,946
Fort Bend ISD $ 141,807,330
Fort Worth ISD 568,022,810
Frisco ISD 8,322,038
Garland ISD 208,603,726
Garner ISD 6,722,730
Graham ISD 3,774,249
Grand Prairie ISD 128,648,276
Grapevine-Colleyville ISD 764,084,256
Harlingen ISD 42,211,242
Henderson ISD 3,436,100
Hidalgo ISD 13,156,944
Highland Park ISD 82,429,879
Hillsboro ISD 2,390,694
Humble ISD 6,875,100
Huntsville ISD 10,455,080
Iowa Park CISD 9,845,651
Judson ISD 68,825,920
Klein ISD 44,398,320
La Porte ISD 369,313,860
La Vega ISD 746,690
Lamar CISD 2,819,020
Lancaster ISD 12,595,552
Lewisville ISD 553,483,213
Lindale ISD 6,641,929
Lubbock ISD 56,940
Lufkin ISD 27,377,502
Manor ISD 285,402,353
Mansfield ISD 75,897,459
Marble Falls ISD 1,433,162
Marshall ISD 42,669,770
McAllen CISD 91,253,373
McGregor ISD 14,967,800
McKinney ISD 172,304,095
Mesquite ISD 86,971,648
Midlothian ISD 60,710,091
Midway ISD 612,100
Mission CISD 35,610,465
Montgomery ISD 19,749,849
Nacogdoches ISD 19,806,950
New Deal ISD 29,501,477
New Waverly ISD 188,177
North Lamar ISD 33,083,930
Northwest ISD 943,112,865
Palestine ISD 12,489,017
Paris ISD 14,224,640
Pearland ISD 20,363,910
Pflugerville ISD $ 245,696,410
Plano ISD 284,664,389
Point Isabel ISD 10,687,841
Red Oak ISD 322,684
Richardson ISD 192,359,073
Robstown ISD 606,666
Rockdale ISD 21,462,310
Rockwall ISD 10,658,736
Royse City ISD 2,606,251
San Angelo ISD 25,752,060
San Antonio ISD 99,982,850
San Benito ISD 55,958,415
San Felipe-Del Rio CISD 43,547,306
Schertz-Cibolo-Universal City ISD 56,027,673
Sharyland ISD 174,708,222
Socorro ISD 466,434,452
Spring ISD 55,737,400
Stafford MSD 164,954,695
Stephenville ISD 46,633,385
Sunnyvale ISD 46,719,349
Terrell ISD 57,672,007
Tolar ISD 100,301
Troup ISD 771,719
Tyler ISD 138,588,404
Veribest ISD 10,505,691
Waco ISD 25,838,660
Waller ISD 10,531,286
Waxahachie ISD 75,287,223
Weatherford ISD 10,995,852
West Orange-Cove CISD 101,481,760
West Oso ISD 8,278,866
Westwood ISD 2,848,503
Whitehouse ISD 43,300,830
Wichita Falls ISD 52,346,217
Wilmer-Hutchins ISD 27,389,291
Winona ISD 10,112,839
Winters ISD 4,183,490
Wylie ISD 20,249,812
Total (131 ISDs) $13,152,409,001
Source: Carole Keeton Strayhorn, Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, Property Tax Division.