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Higher Education

Article III agencies for higher education include the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, the state’s public institutions of higher education and various services and laboratories.

Total expenditures for programs in Article III higher education agencies rose from $3.5 billion in fiscal 1990 to $5.9 billion in 2002, an increase of 68.4 percent. In real (1990) dollars, the 2002 total was $4.3 billion, a 23.1 percent increase. Article III higher education expenditures made up nearly 10.9 percent of all expenditures used in calculating the statewide index.

The review team created 91 separate expenditure indices for Article III higher education institutions and agencies, the majority of them using enrollment as their workload measure.

As noted above, higher education has seen lower unit cost growth than any other major category of government. The Article III index for 2002 was just 1.12, representing a combined real increase of just 12 percent since 1990.

The largest individual Article III higher education indices for 2002 include:

6.38, for the University of Texas Health Center at Tyler’s “All Other” (non-salary) expenditures. Total expenditures for this purpose rose from $3.1 million in fiscal 1990 to $34.1 million in 2002, a 997.6 percent increase. Real (1990 dollars) expenditures rose to $24.8 million, for a 698.7 percent increase. Real expenditures per 10,000 Texans, the workload measure in this case, rose by 537.5 percent from 1990 to 2002. Expenditures for this index accounted for 0.6 percent of all Article III higher education spending in fiscal 2002.

3.16, for the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center’s “All Other” (non-salary) expenditures. Total expenditures rose from $21 million in fiscal 1990 to $114.4 million in 2002, a 444.9 percent increase; real expenditures rose to $83.2 million, a 296.5 percent increase. Real expenditures per 10,000 Texans rose by 216.5 percent during this period. The index accounted for 1.95 percent of all Article III higher education spending in 2002.

2.02, for Lamar State College-Port Arthur expenditures. Total expenditures for this index rose from $4.5 million in fiscal 1990 to $14.6 million in 2002, a 225 percent increase; real expenditures rose to $10.8 million, a 140.8 percent increase. Student enrollment rose from 2,053 in 1990 to 2,444 in 2002, a 19.1 percent increase. Real expenditures per student increased by 102.3 percent during this period. The index accounted for 0.25 percent of all Article III higher education spending in 2002.

2.01, for the Texas Forest Service’s “All Other” (non-salary) expenditures. Total spending for this index rose from $3.1 million in 1990 to $10.8 million in 2002, a 245.3 percent rise. Real expenditures rose to $7.9 million, a 151.3 percent increase. Real expenditures per 10,000 Texans rose by 100.6 percent over the study period. Spending for this index accounted for only 0.2 percent of all Article III higher education spending in 2002.

All other Article III higher education indices fell below 2.0 in 2002.

The indices with the largest share of Article III higher education expenditures in 2002 were:

public community/junior college spending, which accounted for 13.5 percent of the total. This funding provides administrative and instructional services to support academic, technical and vocational education. Total expenditures for the category rose from $509.4 million in fiscal 1990 to $789.5 million in 2002, a 55 percent increase. Real expenditures rose to $584.7 million (14.8 percent). Student enrollment growth outpaced growth in real expenditures, rising from 371,299 to 502,358 during the study period. As a result, real expenditures per enrolled student declined by 15.2 percent, producing an index of 0.85.

the University of Texas at Austin, with 9.2 percent of the total. Total spending for this index rose from $336.5 million in 1990 to $538.5 million in 2002, a 60 percent increase; real expenditures rose by 18.5 percent, to $398.9 million. Student enrollment rose slightly during the study period, rising from 49,617 to 52,273. Real expenditures per enrolled student rose by 12.5 percent, producing an index of 1.12.

Texas A&M University at College Station, with 6.5 percent of total spending. Total expenditures for the index rose from $225.9 million in fiscal 1990 to $379.7 million in 2002, a 68.1 percent increase. Real expenditures rose to $281.2 million, for a 24.5 percent increase. Student enrollment rose by 14.7 percent over the study period, from 39,346 to 45,143; as a result, real expenditures per student increased by 8.5 percent, for an index of 1.08.