Labor Day

Quick Start for:

Education

Economic growth begins with an educated work force. Texas’ ability to develop a well-educated and highly skilled work force is essential to its competitive position in the global economy.

Public schools in the Upper East Texas region are maintaining high levels of academic recognition, and enrollment in area colleges and universities is increasing.

Music Competition at Palestine Independent School District. PHOTO: Craig Harris/PISD

Music Competition at Palestine Independent School District

PHOTO: Craig Harris/PISD

Within the region, all graduating students in Avinger ISD took college entrance exams in the 2005-06 school year.

Public Education

Exhibit 42

Ethnicity of Public School Students Upper East Texas Region, 2001-02 vs. 2007-08 School Years

Ethnicity 2001-02 2007-08
White 65.0% 60.3%
Hispanic 12.5% 18.0%
Black 21.6% 20.4%
Asian/Pacific Islander 0.6% 0.8%
Native American 0.4% 0.5%

Source: Texas Education Agency.

Exhibit 43

2007-2008 Accountability Ratings School Districts

Rating Upper East Texas Statewide
Exemplary 0.8% 3.5%
Recognized 22.2% 26.7%
Academically Acceptable 75.4% 66.6%
Academically Unacceptable 1.6% 3.0%
Not Rated: Other* 0.0% 0.2%

Source: Texas Education Agency.

Exhibit 44

2007-2008 Accountability Ratings School Campuses

Rating Upper East Texas Statewide
Exemplary 8.7% 12.2%
Recognized 33.8% 34.4%
Academically Acceptable 48.7% 42.8%
Academically Unacceptable 1.9% 2.6%
Not Rated: Other 7.0% 8.0%

Source: Texas Education Agency.

*Note: “Not Rated: Other” includes campuses such as alternative education programs or early childhood education centers. These data include charter districts. Totals may not equal 100 percent due to rounding.

About 4.1 percent of the state’s public elementary and secondary students go to school in Upper East Texas. The region is home to 121 public school districts with 479 campuses, as well as five charter districts and their six campuses. Upper East Texas schools provide early childhood through Grade 12 education for more than 190,000 students.

The region’s number of students has grown over the past several years, rising by 3.5 percent between the 2001-02 and 2007-08 school years. This increase represents a net gain of more than 6,400 students.1 The population of the region, state and nation grew by 6.4, 11.8 and 6.0 percent, respectively, over the same time period.2

In the 2007-08 school year, the region’s largest independent school districts (ISDs) by enrollment were Tyler ISD in Smith County, with more than 18,000 students, and Longview ISD in Gregg County, with more than 8,000 students. The smallest districts were Marietta in Cass County, with 31 students, and Malta in Bowie County, with 118 students.

The Upper East Texas region, like the state, has seen its public school population become more diverse and more Hispanic (Exhibit 42).3 But it is still less ethnically diverse than the statewide student population, which is 47.2 percent Hispanic, 34.8 percent White, 14.3 percent Black, 3.4 percent Asian/Pacific Islander and 0.3 percent Native American.4

The region has seen an increase in the number of economically disadvantaged students. In 2001-02, nearly 86,000 students or 46.6 percent of total enrollment were identified as economically disadvantaged.5 In 2007-08, almost 102,000 students or 53.5 percent of the region’s students were classified in this way. This was lower, however, than the statewide average of 55.2 percent.6

Accountability

The region’s districts compared favorably with statewide averages in the 2007-2008 district accountability ratings established by the Texas Education Agency (TEA). The Upper East Texas region exceeded the state average for Academically Acceptable ratings. In addition, the region’s districts fared better than the statewide average in districts deemed Academically Unacceptable (Exhibit 43).

As of August 2008, one of the region’s 126 districts was rated Exemplary; 28 were rated Recognized; 95 were rated Academically Acceptable; and 2 were rated Academically Unacceptable.

Upper East Texas also exceeded statewide averages in its number of campuses rated Academically Acceptable. A smaller share of its campuses were rated Academically Unacceptable than in the state as a whole (Exhibit 44).

Of the 485 campuses in the region’s districts, including charter schools, 42 were rated Exemplary; 164 were Recognized; 236 were Academically Acceptable; 9 were Academically Unacceptable; and 34 were listed as “Not Rated: Other” in 2007-2008.

All 5 of the region’s charter districts were rated Academically Acceptable. Each of the charter districts campuses received the same rating as its district.7

Among the region’s districts that teach all grade levels, two ISDs in Bowie County had the highest percentage of students passing all Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) tests. Red Lick ISD had the largest percentage of students passing all TAKS, at 97 percent. Malta ISD had the next largest share of students passing all TAKS, at 95. (An average for the Upper East Texas region is not available because TEA reports district data only as percentages.)8

Within the region, all graduating students in Avinger ISD took college entrance exams in the 2005-06 school year. The district’s performance significantly outpaced the statewide average of 65.8 percent. Of the 107 Upper East Texas districts for which data are available, 33 had shares above the state average and 81 had lower shares.

Pleasant Grove ISD had the highest percentage of students taking the tests who scored at or above the criterion score TEA uses to measure college readiness, at 51 percent; the district also had more than 75 percent of its graduating students take at least one of the tests. Statewide, just 27.1 percent of students who took at least one of the tests scored at or above the criterion score.9

Location Museums and Performing Arts Organizations
Carthage Texas Country Music Hall of Fame & Tex Ritter Museum
Edgewood Edgewood Heritage Park and Historical Village
Emory A.C. McMillan African American Museum
Gilmer Flight of the Phoenix Aviation Museum
Henderson The Depot Museum
Kilgore Texas Shakespeare Festival; East Texas Historical Museum
Longview Longview Museum of Fine Arts
Marshall Harrison County Historical Museum; Michelson Museum of Art
Sulphur Springs Southwest Dairy Museum and Education Center
Texarkana Perot Theater; Museum of Regional History & Wilbur Smith Research Library; Discovery Place Children’s Museum;
Ace of Clubs House
Tyler East Texas Symphony Orchestra; Tyler Civic Ballet; Discovery Science Place; Smith County Historical Museum;
Tyler Museum of Art

Sources: Texas Almanac and the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts.

Outcomes

In the 2006-07 school year, 11,061 students graduated from the region’s public high schools.

According to the 2000 Census, 75.1 percent of Upper East Texas residents over the age of 25 had a high school diploma, a GED or some higher education. This was only slightly below the statewide average of 75.7 percent.10

In the 2006-07 school year, 11,061 students graduated from the region’s public high schools, representing about 4.6 percent of the statewide total that year. Tyler ISD had the largest number of graduates (792), while Laneville ISD had the smallest number, with just four graduates.

About 13.1 percent of the region’s students graduated under the state’s most stringent graduation plan, the Distinguished Achievement plan; 57.3 percent under the Recommended plan, which is the required plan; and 29.6 percent under the Minimum plan, a less stringent graduation plan that requires both parental and school approval, or under an Individual Education Plan offered through Special Education (Exhibit 45).11

Exhibit 45

2006 High School Graduates
Upper East Texas Region vs. Statewide

Graduation Plan Upper East Texas Statewide
Distinguished Achievement 13.1% 10.8%
Recommended 57.3% 67.0%
Minimum/IEP 29.6% 22.1%
Distinguished Achievement & Recommended as Percent of Total 70.4% 77.9%

Source: Texas Education Agency.

School Finance

In the 2006-07 school year, the Upper East Texas region’s total school spending per pupil, including debt service, averaged $9,833. This is about 6.1 percent higher than the statewide average of $9,269 for that year.

Twenty-nine districts in the region were 20 percent or more above the statewide spending average. But the region had 94 districts, including charters, which were below the statewide average.12

Excluding charter districts, which do not receive funding from local tax revenue, the region’s lowest total tax rate in 2006 was in the Como-Pickton Consolidated ISD, at $1.117 per $100 of property value. Pine Tree ISD levied the highest rate, at $1.614. The statewide average was $1.452; 37 districts in the Upper East Texas region had higher rates.13

The region generated a lower percentage of its school revenue from local taxes (43.4 percent) than the statewide average of 48.3 percent. Beckville ISD received the largest portion of its school funding from local taxes (74.2 percent), while McLeod ISD had the lowest share (7.1 percent). The percentage of revenue from other local sources, such as transfers and tuition, was only marginally higher in the region than statewide, at 6.9 percent versus 6.3 percent. Clarksville ISD gained 27.4 percent of its revenue from other local sources, for the highest share in the region; the Linden-Kildare Consolidated ISD received the lowest percentage for non-charter schools, at 1.4 percent.

McLeod ISD had the lowest property wealth per pupil in 2006, at $62,959, while Tatum ISD led the region with $1,319,632 per pupil. The regional average was $299,992, or 1.7 percent lower than the statewide average of $305,208.

Texas law requires districts with relatively high property wealth per pupil to share it with less-wealthy districts through a process called “equity transfers.” In 2006, nine districts in the Upper East Texas region transferred roughly $40.9 million, an average of $216 per pupil, to other districts. The statewide average was $286 per pupil. Carthage ISD transferred the largest amount ($15.8 million), while Tatum ISD had the highest per-pupil transfer at $9,403.

McLeod ISD received more than 78 percent of its revenue from the state in 2006, the highest share among districts that also receive some part of their revenue from local taxes. The Daingerfield-Lone Star and Tatum ISDs received the smallest state shares, at 12.9 and 13 percent, respectively. The regional average for 2006 was 39.0 percent, slightly higher than the statewide average of 33.9 percent. The region also received a lower share of federal funds than the statewide average, at 10.7 percent versus 11.5 percent.14

Teachers

The average Upper East Texas teacher salary in the 2007-08 school year was $41,109, 11 percent below the statewide average of $46,178. Tyler ISD had the highest average salary at $44,367. (A district’s average salary can vary due to the length of teachers’ tenure as well as its wage levels. In other words, District A may have a higher average salary than District B because it has a higher percentage of experienced teachers, even though its wage levels for various years of experience may be lower than District B’s.)16

Average salaries in the region rose by 12.8 percent from 2002-03 to 2007-08, compared with a statewide average of 15.5 percent. Panola Charter School had the highest percentage increase over this period, at almost 61 percent.17

The region’s teacher salaries accounted for almost 31 percent of total district expenditures from all funds in 2006-07, about the same as the statewide average of 31.1 percent. Slocum ISD had the highest percentage of teacher salaries to total expenditures, at 46.4 percent. In all, 89 districts in the region devoted a higher percentage of expenditures to teacher salaries than the statewide average, while 37 had lower percentages.

In 2006-07, the region had a lower average number of students per teacher, at 13.3 versus the statewide average of 14.7. Marietta ISD had the lowest number of students per teacher, at 5.3.18

Upper East Texas has 17 institutions of higher education.

Higher Education

Upper East Texas has 17 institutions of higher education (Exhibit 46). These institutions administer 28 campuses across the region. Thirteen of the region’s 23 counties have at least one higher education campus (Exhibit 47).

The region has two public universities, University of Texas at Tyler (UT-Tyler) and Texas A&M University-Texarkana (A&M Texarkana) in Smith County. In addition to its main campus in Tyler, UT-Tyler has a teaching site in Palestine in Anderson County as well as other sites in the region. A&M Texarkana is an upper-level university serving junior, senior and graduate students.

Exhibit 46

Institutions of Higher Education Upper East Texas Region

Institutions of Higher Education Upper East Texas Region

(Institutions of Higher Education Upper East Texas Region in Text Format.)


Exhibit 47

Higher Education Campuses
Upper East Texas Region

Institution City County
Trinity Valley Community College – Palestine Palestine Anderson
University of Texas at Tyler Teaching Site (Palestine) Palestine Anderson
Texarkana College Texarkana Bowie
Texas A&M University – Texarkana Texarkana Bowie
Jacksonville College Jacksonville Cherokee
Lon Morris College Jacksonville Cherokee
Tyler JC – Jacksonville Extension Jacksonville Cherokee
Kilgore College Kilgore Gregg
Kilgore College – Longview Extension Longview Gregg
LeTourneau University Longview Gregg
University of Texas at Tyler Teaching Site (Longview) Longview Gregg
East Texas Baptist University Marshall Harrison
Texas State Technical College – Marshall Marshall Harrison
Wiley College Marshall Harrison
Trinity Valley Community College Athens Henderson
Paris Junior College – Sulphur Springs Extension Sulphur Springs Hopkins
Paris Junior College Paris Lamar
Panola College Carthage Panola
Panola College – Jefferson College Center Jefferson Marion
Texas A&M University – Texarkana Teaching Site (Jefferson) Jefferson Marion
Texas College Tyler Smith
The University of Texas at Tyler Tyler Smith
The University of Texas Health Center at Tyler Tyler Smith
Tyler Junior College Tyler Smith
Tyler Junior College – Lindale Lindale Smith
Northeast Texas Community College Mount Pleasant Titus
Texas A&M University – Texarkana Teaching Site (Mt. Pleasant) Mount Pleasant Titus
Jarvis Christian College Hawkins Wood

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

The Upper East Texas region has seven community college districts – Kilgore College, Northeast Texas Community College, Panola College, Paris Junior College, Texarkana College, Trinity Valley Community College and Tyler Junior College – with a total of 12 campuses in 14 counties. In addition to its main campus, Kilgore College operates a satellite campus in Longview. Similarly, Tyler Junior College operates satellite campuses in Jacksonville and Lindale. Paris Junior College has an additional campus in Sulphur Springs, while Panola College has a site in Jefferson.

In addition, the region has a branch of Texas State Technical College in Marshall.

Upper East Texas also has four private universities: LeTourneau University in Longview; East Texas Baptist University and Wiley College in Marshall; and Texas College in Tyler. There are two private junior colleges, Jacksonville College and Lon Morris College, in Jacksonville.19 Wiley College, Texas College and Jarvis Christian College are historically Black institutions. All are accredited, independent four-year schools.20

Enrollment

In fall 2007, 48,302 students were enrolled in Upper East Texas public and private colleges and universities. Enrollment in public and private four-year universities accounted for 32.1 percent of the total, while the remaining 67.9 percent were enrolled in two-year institutions.

The region’s largest higher education institution by enrollment is Tyler Junior College, with 8,220 students in fall 2007. The smallest public institution is Texas State Technical College, with 705 students enrolled in fall 2007.

Total enrollment in the region’s higher education institutions rose by 26.8 percent between 2000 and 2007. Enrollment at two-year institutions rose by 19 percent compared with 46.9 percent for universities. In numerical terms, universities added 4,944 students while two-year college enrollment increased by 5,237. For the state as a whole, public university enrollment increased by 19.9 percent, while enrollment at public two-year institutions, including community colleges, rose by 31.1 percent.

Among the region’s institutions, UT-Tyler had the largest enrollment growth between 2000 and 2007, adding 2,545 students, a 70.9 percent increase (Exhibit 48).23

Exhibit 48

Fall Headcount Enrollment
Upper East Texas Region, 2000 and 2007

Public Institution Fall 2000 Enrollment Fall 2007 Enrollment Enrollment Change Percent Change
The University of Texas at Tyler 3,592 6,137 2,545 70.9%
Texas A&M University – Texarkana 1,195 1,605 410 34.3%
Regional Total – Public Universities 4,787 7,742 2,955 61.7%
Statewide Total – Public Universities 414,626 497,195 82,569 19.9%
Kilgore College 3,872 5,135 1,263 32.6%
Northeast Texas Community College 1,990 2,458 468 23.5%
Panola College 1,422 1,884 462 32.5%
Paris Junior College 2,936 4,286 1,350 46%
Texarkana College 3,394 3,916 522 15.4%
Trinity Valley Community College 4,588 5,569 981 21.4%
Tyler Junior College 8,240 8,220 -20 -0.2%
Texas State Technical College – Marshall 511 705 194 38%
Regional Total – Two-year Public Colleges 26,953 32,173 5,220 19.4%
Statewide Total – Two-year Community Colleges 431,934 568,760 136,826 31.7%

Private Institution Fall 2000 Enrollment Fall 2007 Enrollment Enrollment Change Percent Change
East Texas Baptist University 1,402 1,404 2 0%
Jarvis Christian College 537 712 175 32.6%
LeTourneau University 2,975 3,921 946 31.8%
Texas College 281 774 493 275%
Wiley College 552 925 373 67.6%
Regional Total – Private Universities 5,747 7,736 1,989 34.6%
Statewide Total – Private Universities 107,400 114,042 6,642 6.2%
Jacksonville College 270 264 -6 -0.98%
Lon Morris College 364 387 23 6.32%
Regional Total – Two-year Private Colleges 634 651 17 2.7%
Statewide Total – Two-year Private Colleges 634 651 17 2.7%

Type of Institution Fall 2000 Enrollment Fall 2007 Enrollment Enrollment Change Percent Change
Regional Total Higher Education 38,121 48,302 10,181 26.7%
Regional Total 4-Year Institutions 10,534 15,478 4,944 46.9%
Regional Total 2-Year Institutions 27,587 32,824 5,237 19%

Note: Regional data do not include enrollment data for branch campuses located in Upper East Texas that are part of a main campus located in other regions, since they are not reported separately to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Data for all institutions includes health-related and independent institutions.

Sources: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board and Independent Colleges and Universities of Texas, Inc.

Accessibility

UT-Tyler had 1,536 first-time undergraduate applicants for its fall 2007 semester. The institution accepted 83.3 percent of them, less than the statewide average of 92 percent. Of the 1,279 students accepted to UT-Tyler, 19.1 percent were in the top 10 percent of their high school graduating classes, compared with 20.4 percent of students accepted to undergraduate institutions statewide.24

Kilgore, Panola, Paris and Trinity Valley community colleges ranked well above the statewide average for both three- and six-year graduation rates in fiscal 2006.

As an upper-level institution, A&M-Texarkana does not admit first-time, full-time, degree-seeking undergraduates.25

Outcomes

Because some degrees require more than four years of study, and because some students may need more time to graduate, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) compares four-year and six-year graduation rates to measure university outcomes. UT-Tyler’s four- and six-year graduation rates were 18.8 percent and 50.9 percent, respectively, in fiscal 2006, lower than statewide averages for both years.27

Since many community college students go on to a university to obtain a four-year degree, THECB compares three-year and six-year graduation rates to measure community college outcomes. Texas State Technical College-Marshall (TSTC-Marshall) had the region’s highest three-year graduation rate in fiscal 2006, while Panola College had the highest six-year graduation rate. Northeast Texas Community College, Kilgore, Paris and Trinity Valley Community Colleges all showed considerable improvement in six-year graduation rates between fiscal 2000 and 2006. Kilgore, Panola, Paris and Trinity Valley community colleges ranked well above the statewide average for both three- and six-year graduation rates in fiscal 2006 (Exhibit 49).28

Exhibit 49

Three- and Six-Year Graduation Rates (First-time, Full-time, Credential-seeking Students)
Upper East Texas Community Colleges

Institution Fiscal 2000, 3-year Fiscal 2000, 6-year Fiscal 2006, 3-year Fiscal 2006, 6-year
Kilgore College 15.3% 35.6% 15.1% 38.8%
Northeast Texas Community College 17.3% 35.6% 22.0% 36.4%
Panola College 26.0% 42.1% 22.1% 40.4%
Paris Junior College 15.2% 30.4% 19.4% 32.5%
Texarkana College 8.2% 24.3% 11.7% 25.5%
Trinity Valley Community College 18.1% 27.6% 19.7% 33.2%
Tyler Junior College 14.9% 27.4% 13.1% 28.5%
Texas State Technical College – Marshall NA NA 24.2% 35.0%
Community Colleges Statewide Average 10.8% 25.7% 12.1% 30.6%

Note: Data are unavailable for Texas State Technical College – Marshall for fiscal year 2000.

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

From fiscal 2000 to fiscal 2007, UT-Tyler’s number of degrees awarded annually rose by 34.9 percent to 1,175, while A&M Texarkana’s count rose by 62.3 percent, to 500. The statewide average increase was 30.3 percent (Exhibit 50).29

Exhibit 50

Degrees Awarded, Upper East Texas Region Public Universities, Fiscal 2000 and 2007

Institution Fiscal 2000 Fiscal 2007 Change Percent Change
The University of Texas – Tyler 871 1,175 304 34.9%
Texas A&M University – Texarkana 308 500 192 62.3%
Statewide Total 78,970 102,897 23,927 30.3%

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.


Exhibit 51

Degrees and Certificates Awarded, Upper East Texas Region Two-Year Colleges, Fiscal 2000 vs. 2007

Institution Fiscal 2000 Fiscal 2007 Change Percent Change
Kilgore College 764 1,037 273 35.7%
Northeast Texas Community College 239 388 149 62.3%
Panola College 304 336 32 10.5%
Paris Junior College 332 554 222 66.9%
Texarkana College 634 615 -19 -3%
Trinity Valley Community College 1,026 1,348 322 31.4%
Tyler Junior College 976 1,273 297 30.4%
Texas State Technical College – Marshall 110 100 -10 -9.1%
Regional Total 4,385 5,651 1,266 28.9%
Community Colleges Statewide Total 37,395 54,916 17,521 46.9%

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Over the same period, Texas community colleges increased their number of degrees and certificates awarded statewide by 46.9 percent. Among the seven community colleges in the region, Paris Junior College had the sharpest increase in degrees awarded, at 66.9 percent (Exhibit 51). Trinity Valley awarded the greatest number in fiscal 2007, at 1,348.30

Affordability

From 2002-03 to 2007-08, UT-Tyler’s annual estimated costs for one student’s tuition and fees, based on 15 credit hours each semester, rose by about 88.7 percent, to $5,382. A&M Texarkana’s tuition and fees rose by 61.2 percent, to $3,721. The statewide average for undergraduate universities rose by about 90.1 percent, to $5,732.

For the 2007-08 school year, the estimated annual cost of tuition and fees, books and supplies, room and board, transportation and personal expenses at UT-Tyler (based on 15 credit hours in both fall and spring) was $16,714. The statewide average was $17,494. The 2007-08 total cost of attending A&M Texarkana was $13,633.

The cost of attending private universities in the region has remained lower than the statewide average for private institutions. For 2007-08, estimated tuition and fee costs for all area private universities except for LeTourneau University were lower than the statewide average of $17,392. In that year, the estimated annual cost of tuition and fees, books and supplies, room and board, transportation and personal expenses for private universities in the Upper East Texas region ranged from a high of $27,382 at LeTourneau University to a low of $15,712 at Jarvis Christian College. The statewide average cost for private institutions was $26,909.

From FY 2000 to FY 2007, resident tuition and fee changes at the region’s seven community colleges ranged from an increase at Texarkana College of $333 to an increase of $806 at Trinity Valley Community College. Meanwhile, the statewide average increase for community colleges was about $696, or about 73 percent. In 2007-08, tuition and fees in the region were lowest at Kilgore and Paris Junior Colleges, at $1,290 each, and highest at TSTC – Marshall, at $2,788.33

Paris Junior College had the sharpest increase in degrees awarded, at 66.9 percent.

The total cost of attending the Upper East Texas region’s community colleges in 2007-08, including tuition and fees, books and supplies, room and board, transportation and personal expenses, ranged from $9,963 for Northeast Texas Community College to $12,625 for TSTC – Marshall. The statewide average for community colleges was $11,935.34


Funding

Total revenue for UT-Tyler, including tuition and fees, general revenue appropriations, federal funds and institutional funds, rose by 21 percent from fiscal 2005 to fiscal 2007. Texas A&M Texarkana’s total revenues increased by 24.6 percent over the same period. These compared with a statewide average rise of 17.1 percent for public universities. (Exhibit 52).35

The cost of attending private universities in the region has remained lower than the statewide average for private institutions.

Total appropriations for community colleges in the 2008-09 biennium increased for all of the region’s community colleges except TSTC – Marshall. Between 2002-03 and 2008-09, statewide appropriations for all community colleges rose by 8 percent (Exhibit 53).36

Contact hours – the time a professor actually spends in the classroom with students – for community, state and technical colleges rose 18.8 percent statewide from fall 2000 to fall 2007. In the Upper East Texas region, contact hours increased at all community colleges, with highs of 34.9 percent for Paris Junior College and 26 percent for Northeast Texas Community College (Exhibit 54).37

Exhibit 52

Public Universities Total Revenue Sources
Upper East Texas Region

The University of Texas at Tyler
Revenue Source Fiscal 2005 Fiscal 2007 Percent Increase
Tuition and fees $13,173,044 $19,220,153 45.9%
State appropriations 27,441,029 31,928,801 16.4%
Federal funds 5,315,742 7,354,629 38.4%
Institutional funds 7,667,143 6,332,770 -17.4%
Total Revenue $53,596,958 $64,836,353 21.0%
Texas A&M University – Texarkana
Revenue Source Fiscal 2005 Fiscal 2007 Percent Increase
Tuition and fees $1,646,519 $2,991,843 81.7%
State appropriations 10,946,629 11,640,825 6.3%
Federal funds 1,585,369 2,247,163 41.7%
Institutional funds 934,040 1,944,392 108.2%
Total Revenue $15,112,557 $18,824,223 24.6%
Statewide
Revenue Source Fiscal 2005 Fiscal 2007 Percent Increase
Tuition and fees $1,839,294,505 $2,220,917,368 20.7%
State appropriations 2,386,973,289 2,623,776,679 9.9%
Federal funds 1,073,599,126 1,179,340,272 9.8%
Institutional funds 1,117,526,847 1,489,717,723 33.3%
Total Revenue $6,417,393,767 $7,513,752,041 17.1%

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.


Exhibit 53

General Revenue Appropriations, Upper East Texas Public Community and Technical Colleges
Upper East Texas Region and Statewide

Institution 2002-03 Biennium 2004-05 Biennium 2006-07 Biennium 2008-09 Biennium Percent Change 2002-03 to 2008-09
Kilgore College $22,877,702 $20,421,978 $20,313,966 $20,366,429 -11%
Northeast Texas
Community College
$7,106,372 $7,454,511 $7,673,140 $7,980,432 12.3%
Panola College $7,156,256 $6,450,357 $6,589,408 $7,287,116 1.8%
Paris Junior College $12,918,410 $13,761,788 $14,999,016 $16,290,310 26.1%
Texarkana College $17,997,556 $16,369,105 $17,888,098 $18,213,070 1.2%
Trinity Valley
Community College
$21,031,204 $20,574,427 $22,142,812 $23,148,354 10.1%
Tyler Junior College $32,391,782 $30,294,730 $31,952,506 $32,974,900 1.8%
Texas State Technical College – Marshall $5,990,069 $4,731,495 $6,214,473 $5,402,152 -10.8%
Public Community & Technical Colleges Statewide Total $1,709,158,821 $1,622,914,188 $1,763,151,222 $1,845,292,200 8%

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.


Exhibit 54

Contact Hours
Upper East Texas Region, 2000 vs. 2007

Institution Fall 2000 Fall 2007 Percent Change
2000 to 2007
Kilgore College 856,308 1,024,216 19.6%
Northeast Texas Community College 345,674 435,520 26%
Panola College 330,432 365,200 10.5%
Paris Junior College 714,864 964,112 34.9%
Texarkana College 722,128 844,392 16.9%
Trinity Valley Community College 977,632 1,091,396 11.6%
Tyler Junior College 1,773,560 1,858,696 4.8%
Texas State Technical College – Marshall 179,328 130,412 -27.3%

Note: Contact hours include only those with a full or part-time faculty instructing by lecture, lab or practicum. Classes taught at an inter-institutional location are excluded.

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.


Endnotes

Required Plug-ins