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Education

Education is the cornerstone of economic growth. Without a strong educational foundation and a well-educated work force, no community, region or state can expect to compete in the global economy. The High Plains region ranks above the statewide average on many educational indicators.

The High Plains exceeded the state average for Exemplary ratings and had a higher share of Recognized districts than the state.

Public Education

The High Plains region is home to 3.3 percent of Texas’ public elementary and secondary students. The region has 110 public school districts with 436 campuses as well as four charter districts and their four campuses. High Plains schools provide early childhood through Grade 12 education for nearly 152,000 students.1

The region’s number of students has changed little in the last five years, rising by just 0.7 percent between the 2001-02 and 2006-07 school years, for a net gain of about 1,000 students. The state student population, by contrast, rose by 10.4 percent over the same period.2

Iles Elementary School in Lubbock, Texas
Photo Credit: Stephanie Johnson/Lubbock ISD Iles Elementary

In 2006-07, the region’s largest independent school districts (ISDs) by enrollment were Amarillo ISD in Potter County, with more than 30,000 students, followed closely by Lubbock ISD in Lubbock County, with nearly 29,000 students. The smallest districts were Grandview-Hopkins in Gray County, with 24 students, and Darrouzett in Lipscomb County, with 74 students.3

As with the state as a whole, the region's public school student population has become more diverse in recent years (Exhibit 41). It is still less ethnically diverse than the statewide student population, however, which is now 35.7 percent White, 46.3 percent Hispanic, 14.4 percent Black, 3.3 percent Asian/Pacific Islander and 0.3 percent Native American.4

Exhibit 41

Ethnicity of Public School Students, High Plains Region

Ethnicity 2001-02 2006-07
White 50.0% 45.8%
Hispanic 41.6% 45.4%
Black 7.1% 7.2%
Asian/Pacific Islander 1.0% 1.2%
Native American 0.3% 0.4%

Source: Texas Education Agency.

Despite its negligible overall enrollment growth, the High Plains region has seen an increase in its share of economically disadvantaged students. In 2001-02, nearly 77,000 students, or 51 percent of total enrollment, were identified as economically disadvantaged; in 2006-07, about 85,000 students, or 56.1 percent of the region’s students, were classified as economically disadvantaged. This was slightly higher than the statewide average of 55.4 percent.5

Accountability

The region’s districts compared favorably with statewide averages in the 2007 district accountability ratings established by the Texas Education Agency (TEA). The High Plains exceeded the state average for Exemplary ratings and had a higher share of Recognized districts than the state; in addition, the region’s districts fared better than the statewide average for the Academically Unacceptable rating (Exhibit 42).6


Exhibit 42

2007 Accountability Ratings, School Districts, High Plains Region vs. Statewide

Rating High Plains Districts Statewide Districts
Exemplary 2.6% 2.2%
Recognized 22.8% 17.8%
Academically Acceptable 73.7% 75.3%
Academically Unacceptable 0.9% 4.6%
Not Rated: Other 0.0% 0.2%

Note: “Not Rated: Other” includes campuses such as alternative education programs or early childhood education centers. These data include charter districts. Numbers may not total due to rounding.

Source: Texas Education Agency.

As of August 2007, three of the region’s 114 districts were rated Exemplary; 26 were rated Recognized; 84 were rated Academically Acceptable; and one was rated Academically Unacceptable.7

The High Plains region also exceeded statewide averages in its number of campuses rated Exemplary and Recognized, and had a smaller share of campuses rated Academically Unacceptable than the state as a whole (Exhibit 43).8

Of 440 total campuses in the region’s districts, including charter schools, 36 were rated Exemplary, 142 were Recognized, 223 were Academically Acceptable, 11 were Academically Unacceptable and 28 were listed as “Not Rated: Other.”9

Of the region’s four charter districts, one was rated Exemplary, two were Academically Acceptable and one was rated Academically Unacceptable. Each of these districts has one campus, which was rated the same as its district.10

Among the districts that teach all grade levels, Texhoma had the highest percentage of students passing all TAKS tests, at 96 percent; excluding charters. TEA reported the statewide average as 67 percent. (An average for the High Plains region is unavailable since TEA reports district data only as percentages.)11

Exhibit 43

2007 Accountability Ratings, School Campuses, High Plains Region vs. Statewide

Rating High Plains Campuses Statewide Campuses
Exemplary 8.2% 8.0%
Recognized 32.2% 29.2%
Academically Acceptable 50.6% 51.0%
Academically Unacceptable 2.5% 3.4%
Not Rated: Other 6.6% 8.4%

Note: “Not Rated: Other” includes campuses such as alternative education programs or early childhood education centers. These data include charter campuses. Numbers may not total due to rounding.

Source: Texas Education Agency.

Within the High Plains region, the percentage of graduating students who took the SAT or ACT college entrance exams reached 100 percent in Cotton Center, Nazareth, Shamrock and Southland ISDs; the statewide average was 65.8 percent. Of the 95 High Plains districts for which data are available, 56 had shares above the state average and 39 had lower percent shares.12

The highest percentage of students taking the tests who scored at or above the criterion score that TEA uses to measure college readiness was 50 percent in Wheeler ISD, which also had 90.9 percent of its graduating students take at least one of the tests. Statewide, 27.1 percent of the students who took at least one of the tests scored at or above the criterion score.13

Outcomes

According to the 2000 Census, 75 percent of High Plains residents over the age of 25 had a high school diploma, a GED or some higher education, only slightly below the state average of 75.7 percent.14

In the 2005-06 school year, 8,861 students graduated from the region’s public high schools, about 3.7 percent of the statewide total in that year. Lubbock ISD had the largest number of graduates (1,647) while Guthrie and Lazbuddie ISDs tied for the smallest number, with just three graduates each.15

Exhibit 44

2006 High School Graduates, High Plains Region vs. Statewide

Graduation Plan High Plains Statewide
Distinguished Achievement 11.8% 10.1%
Recommended 61.3% 65.5%
Minimum/IEP* 26.9% 24.3%
Distinguished Achievement & Recommended
(Percent of Total)
73.1% 75.7%

*IEP: An individual education plan for students in Special Education. Note: Numbers may not total due to rounding.

Source: Texas Education Agency.

About 11.8 percent of the region’s students graduated under the Distinguished Achievement plan, the state’s most stringent graduation plan; 61.3 percent under the Recommended plan, which is the required plan; and 26.9 percent under the Minimum plan, a less-stringent graduation plan that requires both parental and school approval, or under an Individual Education Plan offered through Special Education (Exhibit 44). Among the region’s non-charter districts, Nazareth, Texline, McLean, Gruver, Hartley, Amherst, Spade, Adrian and Texhoma had 100 percent of their students graduate under the Distinguished Achievement or Recommended plan.16

According to TEA, 92 of the region’s 104 non-charter districts serving high school students had dropout rates lower than the statewide average of 3.7 percent. In the 62 High Plains districts, including charters, for which student totals are available, 1,379 Grade 9-12 students dropped out during the 2005-06 school year.17

School Finance

In the 2005-06 school year, the High Plains region’s total school spending per pupil, including debt service, averaged $9,432, about 2 percent lower than the statewide average of $9,629.18

In all, 39 districts in the region were 20 percent or more above the statewide spending average, while only 11 districts, including charters, fell more than 20 percent below the statewide average.19

Texas Economic Development Act

Excluding charter districts and Boys Ranch ISD, which do not receive funding from local tax revenue, the region’s lowest total tax rate in 2006 was in Kelton ISD, at 90 cents per $100 of property value. Muleshoe and Shallowater ISDs levied the highest rate, at $1.67. The statewide average was $1.452; only 21 districts in the High Plains region had higher rates.

The High Plains region gained a smaller percentage of its school revenue from local taxes than the statewide average, at 43.8 percent versus 48.3 percent. Guthrie ISD obtained the largest percentage of its school funding from local taxes (85.9 percent), while Morton ISD had the lowest share (12.3 percent). The percentage of revenue from other local sources, such as transfers and tuition, however, was higher in the region than statewide, at 7 percent compared to 6.3 percent. Ralls obtained 55.6 percent of its revenue from other local sources, for the highest share in the region, while Amherst ISD had the lowest share for non-charter schools, at 1.6 percent.

Students from the High Plains region are more likely to attend a Texas institution within their region than students throughout the state.

Nazareth ISD had the lowest property wealth per pupil in 2006, at $96,747, while Fort Elliott led the region with $7,745,954 per pupil. The regional average was $320,157, 4.9 percent higher than the statewide average of $305,208. As noted above, Texas law requires districts with relatively high property wealth per pupil to share it with less-wealthy districts through a process called “equity transfers.” In 2006, 23 districts in the High Plains region transferred $65.5 million, an average of $433 per pupil, to other districts; the statewide average was $286 per pupil. Denver City transferred the largest amount ($14.7 million), while Fort Elliott ISD had the highest per pupil transfer at $43,804.

Hedley ISD received nearly 70 percent of its revenue from the state in 2006, the highest share among districts that also receive some part of their revenue from local taxes. Guthrie ISD received the smallest state share, 4.1 percent. The regional average for 2006 was 36.3 percent, slightly higher than the statewide average of 33.9 percent. The region also received a higher share of federal funds than the statewide average, at 12.8 percent versus 11.5 percent.20

Museums and the Arts

Museums of Arts, Science and History, Performing Arts Organizations and Film Commissions

County Name City Venue Name
Armstrong Claude Armstrong County Museum and Gem Theatre
Carson Panhandle Carson County Square House Museum
Dallam Dalhart XIT Museum
Donley Clarendon Saints’ Roost Museum
Lubbock Lubbock Buddy Holly Center, Museum of Texas Tech University, National Ranching Heritage Center,
Science Spectrum Museum, Lubbock Arts Alliance
Potter Amarillo Cadillac Ranch, Amarillo Museum of Art, American Quarter Horse Heritage Center and Museum,
Don Harrington Discovery Center, Amarillo Symphony, Lonestar Ballet, Amarillo Film Commission, Texas Panhandle Film Commission
Randall Canyon Panhandle Plains Historical Museum
Wheeler Mobeetie Old Mobeetie Texas Association Museum

Sources: 2006-2007 Texas Almanac, Armstrong County Museum and Roadside America.

Teachers

The average High Plains teacher salary in 2006-07 was $41,448, 7.7 percent below the statewide average of $44,897. Guthrie ISD had the highest average salary, at $48,883. (Note that a district’s average salary can vary due to the length of teachers’ tenure as well as its wage levels; in other words, District A may have a higher average salary than District B because it has a higher percentage of experienced teachers, even though its wage levels for various years of experience may be lower than District B’s.)21

Average teacher salaries in the High Plains region rose by 12 percent from 2001-02 to 2006-07, compared with a statewide average increase of 14.4 percent. South Plains ISD had the highest percentage increase over this period, at 39 percent.22

Exhibit 45

Institutions of Higher Education, High Plains Region

Institutions of Higher Education, High Plains Region

(Institutions of Higher Education, Text Alternative)

The region’s teacher salaries accounted for 31.7 percent of total district expenditures from all funds in 2005-06, slightly higher than the statewide average of 29.1 percent. The expenditure share within the region was highest at 42.5 percent for Higgins ISD. In all, 89 districts in the region devoted a higher percentage of expenditures to teacher salaries than the statewide average, while 27 had lower percentages.23

The region’s teacher turnover rate from 2005-06 to 2006-07 was 14.3 percent, slightly below the statewide average of 15.6 percent. Kelton, Spring Creek, Walcott and Wellman-Union ISDs had no teachers leave. In all, 20 school districts in the region had teacher turnover rates in excess of 25 percent in 2006-07, while 22 districts had turnover rates of less than 10 percent.

In 2006-07, the region had a lower average number of students per teacher, at 12.8 versus a statewide average of 14.7. Guthrie ISD had the smallest number of students per teacher, at 4.9.24

Higher Education

The High Plains region has nine institutions of higher education (Exhibit 45).

These institutions administer 17 campuses across the region. Ten of the region’s 41 counties have at least one higher education campus (Exhibit 46).

The High Plains region has two public universities, Texas Tech University (TTU) in Lubbock and West Texas A&M University (WAMU) in Canyon in Randall County. In addition to its main campus in Lubbock, TTU has a teaching site in Amarillo in Potter County as well as other sites outside the region.25

High Plains has one health-related institution, Texas Tech University Health Science Center (TTUHSC) in Lubbock; the center also operates a regional academic health
center in Amarillo, as well as in Midland-Odessa and El Paso. Both the Lubbock and Amarillo centers offer schools of allied health sciences, medicine and pharmacy; in addition, the Lubbock campus has schools of biomedical sciences and nursing.26

Exhibit 46

Higher Education Campuses High Plains Region

Institution City County
Amarillo College Amarillo Potter
Amarillo College Moore County Center - Dumas Dumas Moore
Clarendon College Clarendon Donley
Clarendon College – Pampa Center Pampa Gray
Frank Phillips College Borger Hutchinson
Frank Phillips College at Perryton Perryton Ochiltree
South Plains College Levelland Hockley
South Plains College – Byron Martin Advanced Tech Center Lubbock Lubbock
South Plains College – Plainview Extension Center Plainview Hale
South Plains College – Reese Center Extension Lubbock Lubbock
Texas Tech University Lubbock Lubbock
Texas Tech University Teaching Site Amarillo Potter
Texas Tech Health Sciences Center Regional Academic Health Center Amarillo Potter
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Lubbock Lubbock
West Texas A&M University Canyon Randall
Lubbock Christian University Lubbock Lubbock
Wayland Baptist University Plainview Hale

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

The High Plains region has four community college districts — Amarillo, Clarendon, Frank Phillips and South Plains. In addition to their main campuses, these districts operate six satellite campuses.27 These colleges offer hundreds of workforce education and training programs in a wide variety of technical and academic subjects. Colleges work collaboratively with local businesses to tailor training programs to meet employer and regional demands.

The region also has two private universities, Lubbock Christian University (LCU) in Lubbock and Wayland Baptist University (WBU) in Plainview in Hale County. WBU also has campuses in Amarillo and Lubbock as well as additional sites in Texas, other states and Kenya.28

Students from the High Plains region are more likely to attend a Texas institution within their region than students throughout the state. In fall 2005, 20.1 percent of students from the High Plains region who were attending a Texas public university did so outside the region; statewide, 36.3 percent of students attended a university outside their home region. About 3.6 percent of students from the High Plains region attending two-year colleges were attending a two-year college outside the region, compared with 5.6 percent statewide.29

Enrollment

In fall 2005 (most recent available data), a larger share of High Plains residents were enrolled in a Texas public two- or four-year institution than the state average (4.4 percent versus 4.2 percent). The region also exceeded the state average for its share of the population at two-year Texas public colleges (2.5 percent versus 2.3 percent statewide) and tied the state average for its share of the population at Texas public universities (1.9 percent).30

Exhibit 47

Public High School Graduates Entering Texas
Public Higher Education in the Following Year

Enrolled in Universities

Graduating Class High Plains Statewide
1999-2000 21.0% 20.9%
2003-2004 22.2% 24.4%

Enrolled in Two-Year Colleges

Graduating Class High Plains Statewide
1999-2000 27.8% 29.8%
2003-2004 31.1% 30.1%

Not Enrolled

Graduating Class High Plains Statewide
1999-2000 51.2% 49.3%
2003-2004 46.8% 45.4%

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

The region fell slightly below the state average in its share of 2003-04 high school graduates who enrolled in a Texas public university in the fall after graduation, but exceeded the state average in its percentage of graduates who enrolled at public two-year colleges in the following fall. From 2000-01 to 2004-05, the region increased its share of recent graduates enrolled in higher education institutions from 48.8 to 53.2 percent (Exhibit 47).31

Dancing in Lipscomb County


In fall 2007, 66,252 persons were enrolled in High Plains public and private colleges and universities. Enrollment in public and private four-year universities and health-related institutions accounted for 67.2 percent of the total, while the remaining 32.8 percent were enrolled in two-year institutions.

The region’s largest higher education institution by enrollment is TTU, with 28,408 students enrolled in fall 2007. The smallest institution is Clarendon Community College, with 1,123 students enrolled in fall 2007.32

Total enrollment in the region’s higher education institutions rose by 15.9 percent between 2000 and 2007. Community college enrollment rose by 22.2 percent, compared to 13 percent for universities. In numbers, universities added 5,135 students while community college enrollment increased by 3,947. For the state as a whole, university enrollment increased by 18.4 percent, while enrollment at two-year institutions, including community colleges, rose by 32.4 percent.35

Among the region’s institutions, TTU had the largest enrollment growth between 2000 and 2007, adding 4,209 students, while TTUHSC enjoyed the highest percentage growth (52.2 percent) (Exhibit 48).36

Exhibit 48

Fall Enrollment at Higher Education Institutions, High Plains Region, 2000 vs. 2007

Institution Fall 2000 Enrollment Fall 2007 Enrollment Enrollment Change Percent Change
Texas Tech University 24,199 28,408 4,209 17.4%
West Texas A&M University 6,775 7,508 733 10.8%
Wayland Baptist University 5,093 4,046 -1,047 -20.6%
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center 1,719 2,616 897 52.2%
Lubbock Christian University 1,617 1,960 343 21.2%
Regional Total – Universities 39,403 44,538 5,135 13.0%
Statewide Total – Universities 536,113 634,791 98,678 18.4%
Amarillo College 8,181 9,995 1,814 22.2%
South Plains College 7,432 9,297 1,865 25.1%
Frank Phillips College 1,153 1,299 146 12.7%
Clarendon College 1,001 1,123 122 12.2%
Regional Total – Two-year Colleges 17,767 21,714 3,947 22.2%
Statewide Total – Two-year Colleges 448,632 594,106 145,474 32.4%
Regional Total – All Institutions 57,170 66,252 9,082 15.9%
Statewide Total – All Institutions 984,745 1,228,897 244,152 24.8%

Note: Enrollment data for Texas Tech University, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center and Wayland Baptist University represent statewide enrollment, including enrollment on campuses outside the High Plains region.

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Accessibility

TTU had 13,323 first-time undergraduate applicants for its fall 2006 semester. The institution accepted 71.5 percent of them, less than the statewide average of 87.6 percent. Of the 9,522 students accepted to TTU, 23.8 percent were in the top 10 percent of their high school graduating classes, compared to 23 percent of students accepted to undergraduate institutions statewide.

WAMU had 1,661 first-time undergraduate applicants for its fall 2006 semester; the institution accepted 95.2 percent of them. Of the 1,581 who were accepted, 29.5
percent were in the top 10 percent of their high school graduating classes.37

Outcomes

According to the 2000 Census and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, 24.1 percent of High Plains residents over the age of 25 had an associate’s degree or higher; the state average was 28.5 percent. The region’s share of adults over the age of 25 with a bachelor’s degree or higher was 18.8 percent, compared to the state average of 23.2 percent.38

Because some degrees require more than four years of study, and because some students may need more time to graduate, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) compares four-year and six-year graduation rates to measure university outcomes. TTU’s four- and six-year graduation rates improved between fiscal 1999 and fiscal 2006, and were much higher than statewide averages for both years. WAMU’s graduation rates, and particularly its six-year rate, improved from fiscal 1999 to fiscal 2006, but remained below the statewide average in both years (Exhibit 49).39

Exhibit 49

Four- and Six-Year Graduation Rates, High Plains Public Universities

Institution Fiscal 1999 4-year Fiscal 1999 6-year Fiscal 2006 4-year Fiscal 2006 6-year
Texas Tech University 24.0% 56.7% 34.7% 66.0%
West Texas A&M University 13.1% 32.4% 19.6% 44.2%
Statewide Average 18.0% 49.2% 25.1% 57.2%

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Because many community college students go on to a university to obtain a four-year degree, THECB compares three-year and six-year graduation rates to measure community college outcomes. Clarendon College had the High Plains region’s highest three-year and six-year graduation rate in fiscal 2006. Amarillo, Frank Phillips and South Plains all showed considerable improvement in six-year graduation rates between fiscal 2000 and 2006. Amarillo, Clarendon and Frank Phillips colleges ranked at or above the statewide average for both three- and six-year graduation rates in fiscal 2006 (Exhibit 50).40

Exhibit 50

Three- and Six-Year Graduation Rates, High Plains Community Colleges

Institution Fiscal 2000 3-year Fiscal 2000 6-year Fiscal 2006 3-year Fiscal 2006 6-year
Amarillo College 9.4% 29.3% 12.1% 31.6%
Clarendon College * 40.7% 36.3% 38.7%
Frank Phillips College 18.2% 23.7% 26.5% 37.0%
South Plains College 14.6% 26.1% 11.4% 28.4%
Statewide Average 10.8% 25.7% 12.1% 30.6%

* Fewer than 20 students started in this group.

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

From fiscal 2000 to fiscal 2007, the number of degrees TTU awarded rose by 27.8 percent, to 6,144, while WAMU’s count rose by 30.6 percent, to 1,463; the statewide average increase was 30.3 percent (Exhibit 51).41

Exhibit 51

Degrees Awarded Public Universities, High Plains vs. Statewide

Institution Fiscal 2000 Fiscal 2007 Percent Increase
Texas Tech University 4,807 6,144 27.8%
West Texas A&M University 1,120 1,463 30.6%
Statewide 78,970 102,897 30.3%

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Over the same period, community colleges increased their number of degrees and certificates awarded statewide by 46.9 percent. Among the four community colleges in the region, South Plains College had the sharpest increase in degrees awarded, at 129.8 percent (Exhibit 52).42

Affordability

Exhibit 52

Degrees and Certificates Awarded, High Plains Region Community Colleges

Institution Fiscal 2000 Fiscal 2007 Percent Increase
Amarillo College 946 1,188 25.6%
Clarendon College 113 240 112.4%
Frank Phillips 157 125 -20.4%
South Plains College 531 1,220 129.8%
Statewide Average 37,395 54,916 46.9%

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

From 2002-03 to 2007-08, TTU’s annual estimated costs for one student’s tuition and fees, based on 15 credit hours each semester, rose by about 79 percent, to $7,083. WAMU’s tuition and fees rose by 61 percent, to $4,794. The statewide average for undergraduate universities rose by about 62 percent, to $5,569.

For the 2007-08 school year, the estimated annual cost of tuition and fees, books and supplies, room and board, transportation and personal expenses at TTU (based on 15 credit hours in both fall and spring) was $18,464, 8.6 percent higher than the statewide average of $16,995. The 2007-08 total cost of attending WAMU was $14,260, 16.1 percent below the statewide average.

The cost of private universities in the region has remained lower than average. Estimated tuition and fee costs for LCU and WBU for 2007-08 were $14,290 and $11,350, respectively, compared to a statewide average of $16,934. LCU’s costs rose by 30 percent between 2002-03 and 2007-08, while WBU’s rose by 31 percent. Over the same period, the statewide average costs for private universities rose by 42 percent.

From 2002-03 to 2007-08, resident tuition and fee increases at the region’s four community colleges ranged from a low of $212 (about 13 percent) at South Plains College to a high of $990 (about 92 percent) at Clarendon College; the statewide average increase for community colleges was $519, about 46 percent. In 2007-08, tuition and fees in the region were lowest at Amarillo College, at $1,614, and highest at Frank Phillips College, at $2,416.43

DID YOU KNOW?

Local taxpayers invested nearly $600 million in High Plains schools in 2006.

The total cost of attending the High Plains region’s community colleges in 2007-08, including tuition and fees, books and supplies, room and board, transportation and personal expenses, ranged from $8,020 for South Plains College to $9,944 for Clarendon College; the statewide average for community colleges was $10,456.44

Funding

Total revenue for TTU, including tuition and fees, general revenue appropriations, federal funds and institutional funds, rose by 19.3 percent from fiscal 2004 to fiscal 2007, compared to a statewide average rise for public universities of 26.6 percent. WAMU’s total revenues increased by 14.5 percent over the same period (Exhibit 53).45

Exhibit 53

Public University Revenue, High Plains Region

Texas Tech University

Revenue Source Fiscal 2004 Fiscal 2007 Percent Increase
Tuition and fees $139,302,765 $171,631,138 23.2%
State appropriations $145,279,324 $162,339,737 11.7%
Federal funds $41,406,291 $45,918,266 10.9%
Institutional funds $56,729,442 $76,858,697 35.5%
Total Revenue $382,717,822 $456,747,838 19.3%

West Texas A&M University

Revenue Source Fiscal 2004 Fiscal 2007 Percent Increase
Tuition and fees $16,116,552 $20,512,059 27.3%
State appropriations $31,901,034 $36,247,434 13.6%
Federal funds $10,757,935 $10,907,329 1.4%
Institutional funds $10,314,451 $11,437,790 10.9%
Total Revenue $69,089,973 $79,104,612 14.5%

Statewide

Revenue Source Percent Increase
Tuition and fees 45.7%
State appropriations 11.3%
Federal funds 17.6%
Institutional funds 41.5%
Total Revenue 26.6%

Note: Excludes “constitutional funds,” which are used for capital purchases. Tuition and fee figures are net of scholarship discounts and allowances. Numbers may not total due to rounding.

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Total appropriations for community colleges in the 2004-05 biennium declined for all of the region’s community colleges except Frank Phillips College. In the 2006-07 biennium, South Plains College regained its loss. Appropriations for the 2008-09 biennium were 11.6 percent above 2002-03 biennial levels for Frank Phillips College and 9.3 percent higher for South Plains College. Statewide appropriations for all community colleges were 10.6 percent higher in 2008-09 than in 2002-03 (Exhibit 54).46

Exhibit 54

Total Appropriations for Public Community Colleges, High Plains Region

Institution 2002-03 Biennium 2004-05 Biennium 2006-07 Biennium 2008-09 Biennium Percent Increase
2002-03 to 2008-09
Amarillo College $42,487,467 $36,839,197 $40,893,709 $41,823,102 -1.6%
Clarendon College $5,429,495 $4,771,960 $4,983,409 $5,099,276 -6.1%
Frank Phillips College $5,913,559 $6,075,777 $6,633,195 $6,602,470 11.6%
South Plains College $32,674,113 $30,772,071 $33,599,515 $35,703,626 9.3%
Statewide $1,832,770,595 $1,727,910,226 $1,905,450,860 $2,027,184,433 10.6%

Note: Data represent actual appropriations. These figures may be higher than the line items in the appropriations bill since they also include appropriated special-purpose funding, group health benefits and account for State Auditor Office audits. Data do not include funds provided indirectly, such as grants or financial aid from THECB.

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.


Endnotes

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