Quick Start for:

Education

In 2008-09, among the region’s districts that teach all grade levels, Friendswood ISD in Galveston County had the highest percentage of students passing all Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) tests, at 94 percent.

Education and work force training are significant drivers of economic development. The educational attainments of Texas workers will largely determine the types of jobs and companies our state can recruit and the level of wages Texans will earn.

Public Education

About 1.2 million students – 25 percent of the state total – attend public elementary and secondary school in the Gulf Coast region, which is home to 79 public school districts with 1,431 campuses as well as 52 charter districts and their 104 campuses. The region’s student population has risen steadily in recent years, growing by 13.7 percent or 139,989 students from the 2002-03 to 2008-09 school years.

During the 2008-09 school year, the region’s largest school districts by enrollment were Harris County’s Houston ISD, with 199,524 students, and Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, with 100,505 students. The smallest districts were Harris County’s Juan B. Galaviz Charter School, with just 64 students, and Jamie’s House Charter School with 79 students.

Exhibit 52

Gulf Coast Region, Ethnicity of Public School Students

Ethnicity 2002-03 2008-09
Asian/Pacific Islander 5.0% 5.8%
Black 20.3% 20.0%
Hispanic 37.7% 43.7%
Native American 0.2% 0.2%
White 36.8% 30.3%

Source: Texas Education Agency.

Exhibit 53

2008-2009 Accountability Ratings, Gulf Coast School Districts

School Districts
Rating Region Statewide
Exemplary 11.5% 9.5%
Recognized 29.0% 37.6%
Academically Acceptable 45.0% 46.1%
Academically Unacceptable 11.5% 5.9%
Not Rated: Other 3.1% 0.9%

Note: “Not Rated: Other” includes campuses such as alternative education programs or early childhood education centers. These data include charter districts. Totals may not equal 100 percent due to rounding.

Source: Texas Education Agency.

Exhibit 54

2008-2009 Accountability Ratings, Gulf Coast School Campuses

School Campuses
Rating Region Statewide
Exemplary 30.6% 25.9%
Recognized 36.4% 35.4%
Academically Acceptable 22.3% 27.9%
Academically Unacceptable 2.0% 2.9%
Not Rated: Other 8.7% 7.9%

“Not Rated: Other” includes campuses such as alternative education programs or early childhood education centers. These data include charter districts.

Source: Texas Education Agency.

Like the rest of the state, the Gulf Coast’s public school population has seen its Hispanic population rise (Exhibit 52). The region’s ethnic distribution is similar to the statewide student population distribution which is 3.6 percent Asian/Pacific Islander, 14.2 percent black, 47.9 percent Hispanic, 0.4 Native American and 34 percent white.1

The Gulf Coast region also has seen an increase in its number of economically disadvantaged students. In 2002-03, 500,824 of its students, or 49 percent of total enrollment, were identified as economically disadvantaged. In 2008-09, this share had risen to 642,838 students or 55.3 percent, slightly less than the statewide average of 56.7 percent.

Accountability

The region’s districts compared similarly to the statewide averages in the 2008-09 district accountability ratings established by the Texas Education Agency (TEA). The region exceeded the statewide average for Exemplary ratings, but fared less favorably for districts deemed Recognized and Academically Acceptable (Exhibit 53).

In November 2009, TEA rated 15 of the region’s 131 districts as Exemplary; 38 as Recognized; 59 as Academically Acceptable; and 15 as Academically Unacceptable. Four of the districts in the region were listed as “Not Rated: Other.”

The Gulf Coast region exceeded statewide averages in the number of campuses rated Exemplary and Recognized. The percentage of campuses rated Academically Unacceptable was very similar to those of the state as a whole. (Exhibit 54).

Of the region’s 1,535 campuses, including charter schools, 470 were rated Exemplary; 558 were rated Recognized; 343 were Academically Acceptable; 31 were Academically Unacceptable; and 133 were listed as “Not Rated: Other” in 2008-09.

Thirteen of the region’s 52 charter districts were rated Exemplary, while 12 were rated as Recognized, 14 as Academically Acceptable, 10 were Academically Unacceptable, and three were “Not Rated: Other.” Twenty-six charter district campuses were rated Exemplary, 26 were Recognized, 34 were Academically Acceptable, 11 were Academically Unacceptable, and seven were “Not Rated: Other.”

In 2008-09, among the region’s districts that teach all grade levels, Friendswood ISD in Galveston County had the highest percentage of students passing all Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) tests, at 94 percent. Barbers Hill ISD in Chambers County had the next-largest share at 89 percent.

Regional leaders for college entrance exams included High Island ISD, in Galveston County, where 100 percent of graduating students took the exams; KIPP Charter, in Harris County, with 91 percent; and North Forest ISD, in Harris County, at 91 percent. Of the 131 Gulf Coast region districts for which data are available, 30 had participation rates above the state average of 65 percent in 2007-08.

In that year, Friendswood ISD also had the highest percentage of test takers scoring at or above the criterion score TEA uses to measure college readiness, at 52.7 percent. Across the state, just 27.2 percent of students who took at least one of the tests scored at or above the criterion score.

In the 2007-08 school year (the most recent data available), the Gulf Coast region had a dropout rate of 4.3 percent compared to a statewide average of 3.2 percent.

Outcomes

In 2008, 79 percent of Gulf Coast residents above the age of 25 had a high school diploma, a General Educational Development (GED) certificate or some higher education, slightly above the statewide average of 75.7 percent.2

Exhibit 55

Gulf Coast Region and Statewide, 2008 High School Graduates

Graduation Plan Region Statewide
Minimum H.S. Plan 81.3% 81.4%
Distinguished Achievement & Recommended H.S. Program 18.7% 18.6%

Source: Texas Education Agency.

In the 2007-08 school year, 59,973 students graduated from the region’s public high schools, representing about 23.8 percent of the statewide total for that year. Houston ISD had the largest number of graduates with 7,976, while Jamie’s Charter School in Harris County had only two. Alphonso Crutch’s-Life Support Center had just one graduate.

About 81.3 percent of the region’s graduates satisfied the course requirements for the Texas State Board of Education Recommended High School Program or Distinguished Achievement Program and 18.7 percent graduated under the Minimum plan, a less stringent graduation plan that requires both parental and school approval (Exhibit 55).

School Finance

In the 2007-08 school year (the most recent data available), the Gulf Coast region’s total school spending per pupil, including debt service, averaged $10,624, 3.6 percent less than the statewide average of $11,024. Twenty-three Gulf Coast region districts spent more than 20 percent above the statewide average in that year. Another 88 districts, however, including the region’s charters, spent less per pupil than the statewide average.

About 81.3 percent of the region’s graduates satisfied the course requirements for the Texas State Board of Education Recommended High School Program or Distinguished Achievement Program.

Excluding charter districts, which do not receive funding from local taxes, the region’s lowest total tax rate in 2008 was that of Tidehaven ISD, at 97 cents per $100 of property value. Katy ISD levied the highest rate at $1.53. The statewide average was $1.20 per $100 of value; 55 districts in the region exceeded it.

The Gulf Coast region generated a substantially higher share of its school revenue from local taxes (44.7 percent) than the statewide average (39.6 percent). Stafford ISD received the largest portion of its school funding from local taxes (68.6 percent), while Splendora ISD had the lowest share (13.5 percent). The region’s share of revenue from other local sources, such as equity transfers and tuition, was similar to the state’s, at 6 percent versus 6.1 percent. The Harmony School of Innovation in Harris County gained 62.5 percent of their revenue from these other local sources, for the region’s highest share; North Forest ISD in Harris County received the lowest share for the region’s non-charter schools, at 2.1 percent.

Splendora ISD had the lowest property wealth per pupil in 2008, at $96,215, while Devers ISD led the region with $2,615,068 per pupil. The regional average was $337,731, or 7.1 percent less than the statewide average of $363,600.

The Texas school finance system requires districts with relatively high property wealth per pupil to share it with less-wealthy districts through a process called “equity transfers.” In 2008, 12 districts in the Gulf Coast region transferred roughly $105.2 million. Deer Park ISD transferred the largest total amount ($19.8 million), while Devers ISD had the highest per-pupil transfer ($31,050).

Among the non-charter districts, Boling ISD received the largest share of its revenue from the state in 2008, at 69.8 percent. Matagorda ISD received the smallest state share, at 17.2 percent. The regional average for 2007-08 was 41.4 percent, lower than the statewide average of 44.8 percent. The region derived 7.8 percent of its school funding from federal aid, a slightly smaller share than the statewide average of 9.5 percent.8

The region’s teacher salaries accounted for more than 30.8 percent of total district expenditures from all funds in 2007-08, slightly higher than the statewide average of 30.1 percent.

Teachers

In examining teacher salaries across the region, it should be noted that average salaries vary with the length of teacher tenure as well as wage levels. District A, for instance, may have a higher average salary than District B because it has a higher percentage of experienced teachers, even though its wage levels for various years of experience are lower than District B’s.

The average Gulf Coast region teacher salary in 2007-08 was $2,391 above the statewide average of $46,179. Devers ISD had the highest average salary at $57,023.

Average salaries in the region rose by 15.9 percent from 2002-03 to 2007-08, slightly more than the statewide average of 15.2 percent over the same period. For charter schools, the Two Dimensions Preparatory Academy had the highest increase for this period at 44.9 percent. Devers ISD had the highest increase for non-charter schools at 33.5 percent.

The region’s teacher salaries accounted for more than 30.8 percent of total district expenditures from all funds in 2007-08, slightly higher than the statewide average of 30.1 percent. KIPP Southeast Houston devoted the highest share of total spending to teacher salaries, at 72.8 percent, while East Bernard ISD in Wharton County led the non-charter schools 43.6 percent. Sixty-three of the region’s districts devoted a smaller share of expenditures to teacher salaries than the statewide average.

In 2007-08, the Gulf Coast region had a slightly higher average number of students per teacher than the state as a whole, at 15 versus 14.4. Among the region’s charter schools, the Excel Academy in Harris County had the lowest number of students per teacher, at 8.2. For non-charter schools, High Island ISD had the lowest ratio, at 7.6 students per teacher.10

Higher Education

The Gulf Coast region has 25 institutions of higher education including five health-related centers. Sixteen of these are in Harris County. Nine of the region’s 13 counties have higher education campuses or facilities (Exhibits 56 and 57).11

In fall 2008, 243,553 students enrolled in the Gulf Coast region’s public and private universities, colleges and health-related institutions.

Exhibit 56

Gulf Coast Region, Higher Education Campuses

see alternative

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

View higher education campus description.

Exhibit 57

Gulf Coast Region, Higher Education Campuses

Institution City County
Alvin Community College Alvin Brazoria
Alvin Community College – Pearland Center Pearland Brazoria
Brazosport College Lake Jackson Brazoria
College of the Mainland Texas City Galveston
Galveston College Galveston Galveston
Texas A&M University at Galveston Galveston Galveston
Houston Community College System Houston Harris
Houston Community Collge System (CCS) – Central College Houston Harris
Houston CCS – Northeast College Houston Harris
Houston CCS – Northwest College Houston Harris
Houston CCS – Southeast College Houston Harris
Houston CCS – Southwest College Houston Harris
Houston CCS – Southwest College – Stafford Stafford Fort Bend
Lee College Baytown Harris
Lee College – Crosby Crosby Harris
Lone Star College – Cy–Fair Houston Harris
Lone Star College – North Harris Houston Harris
Lone Star College – Willow Chase Center The Woodlands Harris
Lone Star College – Carver Center The Woodlands Harris
Lone Star College – Fairbanks Center The Woodlands Harris
Lone Star College – Tomball Tomball Harris
Lone Star College – Conroe Center Conroe Montgomery
Lone Star College – Greenspoint Center Houston Harris
Lone Star College – Kingwood Humble Montgomery
Lone Star College – Montgomery Conroe Montgomery
Lone Star College – University Center The Woodlands Montgomery
San Jacinto College Distrct (CD) – Central Pasadena Harris
San Jacinto CD – Central (La Porte) Pasadena Harris
San Jacinto CD – North Houston Harris
San Jacinto CD – South Houston Harris
The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston Galveston Galveston
The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Houston Harris
The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Houston Harris
Baylor College of Medicine Houston Harris
Houston Baptist University Houston Harris
Rice University Houston Harris
University of St. Thomas Houston Harris
Texas Southern University Houston Harris
Texas Woman’s University Houston Center Houston Harris
University of Houston Houston Harris
University of Houston – Clear Lake Houston Harris
University of Houston – Downtown Houston Harris
Sam Houston State University Huntsville Walker
Prairie View A&M University Prairie View Waller
Prairie View A&M College of Nursing – Houston Center Houston Harris
Wharton County Junior College Wharton Wharton
Wharton County Junior College – CentraPlex Campus Sugar Land Fort Bend
Wharton County Junior College – Bay City Campus Bay City Matagorda
Wharton County Junior College – Fort Bend Technical Center Richmond Fort Bend

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Enrollment

In fall 2008, 243,553 students enrolled in the Gulf Coast region’s public and private universities, colleges and health-related institutions. Enrollment in four-year universities and colleges accounted for 42.2 percent of the total, with another 54.6 percent enrolled in community colleges. The remaining 3.2 percent, or 7,791 students, enrolled in the region’s health-related institutions.

The three University of Houston (UH) campuses in Harris County had 56,045 students enrolled in fall 2008. With an enrollment of 16,612, Sam Houston State University (SHSU) had the region’s second-largest university enrollment. UH’s combined enrollment has risen by 4.1 percent since fall 2003; enrollment at SHSU rose by 23.8 percent over the same period. SHSU and UH’s Downtown campus both exceeded statewide public university enrollment growth of 7.7 percent.

The region’s enrollment in two-year higher educational programs rose from 116,027 in 2003 to 133,003 in 2008, a 14.6 percent increase. During this period, enrollment rose at all public two-year institutions in the Gulf Coast region except for College of the Mainland, Galveston College and Lee College. With both a rising population and the addition of new campuses to accommodate this growth, the Lone Star College System experienced the largest numerical and percentage growth, increasing enrollment by 10,128 additional students or 30 percent between 2003 and 2008.

In all, however, the region’s pace of enrollment growth lagged somewhat behind the statewide rate of 10.6 percent, rising by 9.4 percent (Exhibit 58).12

Exhibit 58

Gulf Coast Region, Fall Headcount Enrollment

Four-Year Universities Headcount Enrollment
(Fall 2003)
Headcount Enrollment
(Fall 2008)
Enrollment Change Percent Change
Texas A&M University at Galveston 1,620 1,612 -8 -0.5%
Texas Southern University 10,888 9,102 -1,786 -16.4
University of Houston 35,066 36,104 1,038 3.0
University of Houston-Clear Lake 7,776 7,658 -118 -1.5
University of Houston-Downtown 10,974 12,283 1,309 11.9
Sam Houston State University 13,417 16,612 3,195 23.8
Prairie View A&M University 7,808 8,203 395 5.1
Regional Total – Four-year Universities 87,549 91,574 4,025 4.6%
Statewide Total – Four-year Universities 472,818 509,136 36,318 7.7%

Public Colleges Headcount Enrollment
(Fall 2003)
Headcount Enrollment
(Fall 2008)
Enrollment Change Percent Change
Alvin Community Colleges 4,049 4,348 299 7.4%
Brazosport College 3,679 3,887 208 5.7
College of the Mainland 3,919 3,561 -358 -9.1
Galveston College 2,240 2,229 -11 -0.5
Houston Community Colleges 33,631 38,529 4,898 14.6
Lee Colleges 6,233 5,841 -392 -6.3
Lone Star Colleges 33,749 43,877 10,128 30.0
San Jacinto Colleges 22,621 24,616 1,995 8.8
Wharton County Junior Colleges 5,906 6,115 209 3.5
Regional Total – Two-year Public Colleges 116,027 133,003 16,976 14.6%
Statewide Total – Two-year Public Colleges 518,597 597,146 78,549 15.1%

Private Institutions Headcount Enrollment
(Fall 2003)
Headcount Enrollment
(Fall 2008)
Enrollment Change Percent Change
Houston Baptist University 2,338 2,564 226 9.7%
Rice University 4,959 5,456 497 10.0
University of St. Thomas 4,826 3,165 -1,661 -34.4
Regional Total – Private Institutions 12,123 11,185 -938 -7.7%
Statewide Total – Private Institutions 114,148 115,048 900 0.8%

Health-Related Institutions Headcount Enrollment
(Fall 2003)
Headcount Enrollment
(Fall 2008)
Enrollment Change Percent Change
The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston 2,059 2,338 279 13.6%
The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston 3,405 3,865 460 13.5
The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center 75 203 128 170.7
Baylor College of Medicine 1,287 1,385 98 7.6
Regional Total – Health-Related Institutions 6,826 7,791 965 14.1%
Statewide Total – Health-Related Institutions* 14,243 17,692 3,449 24.2%

Headcount Enrollment
(Fall 2003)
Headcount Enrollment
(Fall 2008)
Enrollment Change Percent Change
Regional Total 2-Year Institutions 116,027 133,003 16,976 14.6%
Regional Total 4-Year and Health-Related Institutions 106,498 110,550 4,052 3.8%
Regional Total Higher Education 222,525 243,553 21,028 9.4%

* Public institutions only.

Note: Regional data do not include enrollment for branch campuses located in the Gulf Coast region that are part of the main campus located in another region, since they are not reported separately to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Accessibility

The University of Houston - Downtown and Texas Southern University accepted 99.7 and 99.1 percent of their first-time undergraduate applicants, respectively, for the fall 2008 semester, well above the statewide average acceptance rate of 74.4 percent. For both institutions, however, only about 3 percent of those accepted were in the top 10 percent of their high school graduating class.

By contrast, about 16 percent of the applicants accepted at the University of Houston’s main campus were accepted because they were in the top 10 percent of their high school graduating classes, and statewide about 23.7 percent of accepted applicants took advantage of the 10 percent rule. The University of Houston’s main campus acceptance rate was 78.7 percent.13

Exhibit 59

Gulf Coast Region Public Universities, Four- and Six-Year Graduation Rates (First-Time, Full-Time, Degree-Seeking Students)

Institution Fiscal 2000 4-year Fiscal 2000 6-year Fiscal 2007 4-year Fiscal 2007 6-year
Prairie View A&M University 11.7% 29.3% 11.4% 41.1%
Sam Houston State University 14.3% 43.9% 24.4% 50.6%
Texas A&M University at Galveston 19.9% 59.7% 21.4% 61.7%
Texas Southern University 8.4% 14.4% 2.6% 12.7%
University of Houston 11.9% 44.6% 13.7% 49.7%
University of Houston- Clear Lake N/A N/A N/A N/A
University of Houston-Downtown 2.8% 17.8% 1.9% 20.9%
Statewide Average 19.9% 49.6% 25.3% 56.3%

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Exhibit 60

Gulf Coast Region Community Colleges, Three- and Six-Year Graduation Rates (First-Time, Full-Time, Credential-Seeking Students)

Institution Fiscal 2000 3-year Fiscal 2000 6-year Fiscal 2007 3-year Fiscal 2007 6-year
Alvin Community College 13.8% 35.5% 13.7% 36.9%
Brazosport College 16.3% 36.5% 14.6% 34.1%
College of the Mainland 12.8% 23.1% 7.8% 24.9%
Galveston College 8.9% 21.4% 14.1% 22.0%
Lee College 16.4% 29.9% 15.3% 60.6%
Wharton County Junior College 14.1% 35.4% 16.9% 37.8%
Houston Community College System 5.1% 16.8% 10.0% 25.1%
Lone Star College System 4.7% 24.1% 7.3% 28.5%
San Jacinto College District 11.1% 29.3% 13.1% 29.3%
Statewide Average 10.8% 25.7% 11.1% 30.8%

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Outcomes

Because some degrees require more than four years of study, and because some students may need more time to graduate, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) compares four-year and six-year graduation rates to measure university outcomes. Graduation rates improved significantly between fiscal 2000 and fiscal 2007 at most of the region’s universities (Exhibit 59). (The University of Houston - Clear Lake is an upper-division-only institution, and so has no first-time entering undergraduates.)

Because many community college students go on to a university to obtain a four-year degree, THECB also compares three-year and six-year graduation rates to measure community college outcomes.

The Houston Community Colleges’ three- and six-year graduation rates from fiscal 2000 to fiscal 2007 rose, by 4.9 percent and 8.3 percent, respectively. Four of the region’s two-year institutions exceeded the statewide averages for 3-and 6-year graduation rates in 2000 and 2007 (Exhibit 60).

From fiscal 2003 to 2008, the University of Houston-Downtown’s number of degrees awarded rose by 44.8 percent, to 2,095, while the University of Houston main campus, with a much larger student body, increased its number of degrees awarded by 11.8 percent. Five of the Gulf Coast region’s seven public universities exceeded the statewide average increase in degrees awarded of 23.4 percent (Exhibit 61).

Over the same period, the number of degrees and certificates awarded by all Texas community colleges rose by 19.1 percent. In the Gulf Coast region, the Lone Star Colleges increased their number of degrees and certificates awarded by 683.8 percent. Houston Community Colleges saw their enrollments rise by 14.6 percent, but experienced a 499 percent jump in degrees and certificates awarded from fiscal 2003 to 2008 (Exhibit 62).17

Exhibit 61

Gulf Coast Region Public Universities, Degrees Awarded

Institutions Fiscal 2003 Fiscal 2008 Change Percent Change
Prairie View A&M University 1,212 1,552 340 28.1%
Sam Houston State University 2,529 3,443 914 36.1%
Texas A&M University at Galveston 189 263 74 39.2%
Texas Southern University 860 1,355 495 57.6%
University of Houston 6,273 7,016 743 11.8%
University of Houston-Clear Lake 2,009 2,124 115 5.7%
University of Houston-Downtown 1,447 2,095 648 44.8%
Statewide Total 86,377 106,582 20,205 23.4%

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Exhibit 62

Gulf Coast Region Two-Year Colleges, Degrees and Certificates Awarded

Institutions Fiscal 2003 Fiscal 2008 Change Percent Change
Alvin Community College 713 764 51 7.2%
Brazosport College 1,052 417 -635 -60.4%
College of the Mainland 492 402 -90 -18.3%
Galveston College 416 299 -117 -28.1%
Lee College 1,258 1,361 103 8.2%
Wharton County Junior College 742 582 -160 -21.6%
Houston Community College System 583 3,492 2,909 499.0%
Lone Star College System 371 2,908 2,537 683.8%
San Jacinto College District 1,814 2,482 668 36.8%
Statewide Total 46,859 55,809 8,950 19.1%

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Affordability

From 2002-03 to the 2009-10 school year, the costs of all eight public universities in the Gulf Coast region rose sharply, as they generally did statewide.

The increase rate of total costs at Gulf Coast universities’ (including tuition and fees, transportation, books and supplies and room and board) ranged from less than half of the statewide average at Prairie View A&M to almost double the statewide average at Texas Southern University (Exhibit 63).

Tuition and fees at the region’s community colleges rose as well, but generally less than the statewide average cost increase of $750 from 2002-03 to 2009-10. Total student costs for the 2009-10 academic year were higher at Lee College and the San Jacinto Colleges than at the average Texas community college, and lower than average at the region’s other community colleges. Tuition and fee costs were below the state average at all of the region’s community colleges except for Wharton County Junior College.22

Estimated tuition and fee costs for the region’s private universities were higher than the statewide average at both the start and the end of the period.23

Exhibit 63

Gulf Coast Region, Higher Education Costs

Public Universities
Institution Resident Tuition and Fees 2002-03 Resident Tuition and Fees 2009-10 Dollar Change 2002-03 to 2009-10 Percent Change 2002-03 to 2008-09 Resident Total Costs 2002-03 Resident Total Costs 2009-10 Increase Rate 2002-03 to 2009-10
Prairie View A&M University $3,232 $6,664 $3,432 106.2% $14,308 $17,420 21.8%
Sam Houston State University $3,090 $6,515 $3,425 110.8% $14,596 $20,486 40.4%
Texas A&M University-Galveston $4,272 $7,063 $2,791 65.3% $11,194 $19,803 76.9%
Texas Southern University $2,718 $6,401 $3,683 135.5% $12,889 $24,518 90.2%
Texas Womans University $3,432 $6,660 $3,228 94.1% $12,297 $16,940 37.8%
University of Houston $3,735 $8,168 $4,433 118.7% $14,403 $23,622 64.0%
University of Houston-Clear Lake $3,100 $5,798 $2,698 87.0% $16,276 $22,228 36.6%
University of Houston-Downtown $2,778 $5,000 $2,222 80.0% $12,710 $21,676 70.5%
Statewide Average $3,441 $6,557 $3,116 90.6% $13,047 $19,424 48.9%

Public Community Colleges
Institution Resident Tuition and Fees 2002-03 Resident Tuition and Fees 2009-10 Dollar Change 2002-03 to 2009-10 Percent Change 2002-03 to 2008-09 Resident Total Costs 2002-03 Resident Total Costs 2009-10 Increase Rate 2002-03 to 2009-10
Alvin Community College $830 $1,336 $506 61.0% $5,851 $9,337 59.6%
Brazosport College $770 $1,542 $772 100.3% $9,622 $11,300 17.4%
College of the Mainland $639 $1,166 $527 82.5% $9,255 $10,136 9.5%
Galveston College $840 $1,414 $574 68.3% $9,978 $11,794 18.2%
Houston Community College System $645 $1,290 $645 100.0% $8,977 $11,022 22.8%
Lee College $366 $1,302 $936 255.7% $8,380 $15,570 85.8%
Lone Star College* $1,130 $1,152 $22 1.9% $7,310 $11,942 63.4%
San Jacinto College $966 $1,310 $344 35.6% $11,058 $14,099 27.5%
Wharton County Junior College $1,860 $1,920 $60 3.2% $8,640 $12,015 39.1%
Statewide Average $1,120 $1,870 $750 67.0% $9,248 $13,184 42.6%

Private Institutions
Institution Resident Tuition and Fees 2002-03 Resident Tuition and Fees 2009-10 Dollar Change 2002-03 to 2009-10 Percent Change 2002-03 to 2008-09 Resident Total Costs 2002-03 Resident Total Costs 2009-10 Increase Rate 2002-03 to 2009-10
Houston Baptist University $16,916 $20,830 $3,914 23.1% $26,666 $33,205 24.5%
Rice University $22,113 $32,057 $9,944 45.0% $32,043 $46,237 44.3%
University of St. Thomas $13,912 $21,880 $7,968 57.3% $24,504 $36,368 48.4%
Statewide Average $11,943 $19,679 $7,736 64.8% $21,948 $30,102 37.2%

*Lone Star College was formerly known as the North Harris Montgomery Community College District.
Note: Resident total costs include tuition and fees, books and supplies, room and board, transportation and personal expenses.

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Funding

The statewide average for public universities’ total revenue, including tuition and fees, general revenue appropriations, federal funds and institutional funds, rose by 15.6 percent from fiscal 2006 to fiscal 2008. In the Gulf Coast region, Texas A&M - Galveston and Texas Southern were the only public universities that saw their total revenues rise faster than the statewide total over the three-year period. Texas Woman’s University saw a small decrease in revenue. (Exhibit 64).24

Total revenue for Texas community colleges rose by 18.2 percent between fiscal 2006 and 2008, versus 18.9 percent for community colleges in the Gulf Coast region. The largest components of these increases were higher tuition and fees and increased local funds. Brazosport College was the region’s only community college to experience a drop in annual revenues (Exhibit 65).25

Exhibit 64

Gulf Coast Region, Public Universities Total Revenue Sources

Prairie View A&M University
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 % Increase
Tuition and fees $22,422,152 $31,206,589 39.2%
State appropriations $67,843,569 $71,236,822 5.0%
Federal funds $35,264,632 $31,817,364 -9.8%
Institutional funds $11,426,162 $8,315,989 -27.2%
Total Revenue $136,956,515 $142,576,764 4.1%

Sam Houston State University
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 % Increase
Tuition and fees $54,841,797 $64,032,603 16.8%
State appropriations $55,667,854 $62,570,309 12.4%
Federal funds $18,610,904 $20,149,070 8.3%
Institutional funds $22,029,377 $23,828,706 8.2%
Total Revenue $151,149,932 $170,580,688 12.9%

Texas A&M University at Galveston
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 % Increase
Tuition and fees $8,779,204 $10,110,169 15.2%
State appropriations $14,360,121 $19,661,251 36.9%
Federal funds $3,192,525 $3,155,209 -1.2%
Institutional funds $3,960,442 $4,121,833 4.1%
Total Revenue $30,292,292 $37,048,462 22.3%

Texas Southern University
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 % Increase
Tuition and fees $39,718,075 $42,641,753 7.4%
State appropriations $68,689,525 $93,489,322 36.1%
Federal funds $39,397,379 $38,069,003 -3.4%
Institutional funds $10,777,027 $9,252,331 -14.2%
Total Revenue $158,582,006 $183,452,409 15.7%

Texas Woman’s University
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 % Increase
Tuition and fees $49,571,800 $51,054,036 3.0%
State appropriations $67,297,704 $70,698,647 5.1%
Federal funds $10,137,709 $12,023,836 18.6%
Institutional funds $26,626,538 $12,906,955 -51.5%
Total Revenue $153,633,751 $146,683,474 -4.5%

University of Houston
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 % Increase
Tuition and fees $171,220,730 $201,355,431 17.6%
State appropriations $187,972,811 $218,669,963 16.3%
Federal funds $75,333,190 $81,430,949 8.1%
Institutional funds $178,198,916 $188,276,980 5.7%
Total Revenue $612,725,647 $689,733,323 12.6%

University of Houston-Clear Lake
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 % Increase
Tuition and fees $26,872,538 $30,994,061 15.3%
State appropriations $34,118,285 $36,409,638 6.7%
Federal funds $4,952,211 $4,773,441 -3.6%
Institutional funds $7,212,082 $9,823,499 36.2%
Total Revenue $73,155,116 $82,000,639 12.1%

University of Houston-Downtown
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 % Increase
Tuition and fees $26,965,114 $36,592,057 35.7%
State appropriations $30,911,056 $36,065,651 16.7%
Federal funds $19,233,131 $18,360,892 -4.5%
Institutional funds $12,224,032 $7,231,658 -40.8%
Total Revenue $89,333,333 $98,250,258 10.0%

Statewide
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 % Increase
Tuition and fees $2,000,693,293 $2,400,749,604 20.0%
State appropriations $2,599,091,546 $2,949,486,914 13.5%
Federal funds $1,161,122,338 $1,260,930,090 8.6%
Institutional funds $1,375,219,819 $1,638,009,659 19.1%
Total Revenue $7,136,126,996 $8,249,176,267 15.6%

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Exhibit 65

Gulf Coast Region, Public Community and Technical College Revenue

Alvin Community College
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 % Increase
Tuition and fees $5,704,873 $6,925,943 21.4%
State Funds $10,341,879 $10,903,716 5.4%
Local Fund $9,177,750 $11,102,379 21.0%
Other Revenue $4,535,912 $4,439,356 -2.1%
Total Revenue $29,760,414 $33,371,394 12.1%

Brazosport College
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 % Increase
Tuition and fees $5,531,324 $6,351,568 14.8%
State Funds $7,041,120 $8,018,292 13.9%
Local Fund $6,379,857 $8,145,443 27.7%
Other Revenue $6,905,365 $3,025,053 -56.2%
Total Revenue $25,857,666 $25,540,356 -1.2%

College of the Mainland
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 % Increase
Tuition and fees $5,459,023 $5,620,209 3.0%
State Funds $8,445,141 $9,572,171 13.3%
Local Fund $16,622,799 $20,887,193 25.7%
Other Revenue $7,310,480 $8,845,230 21.0%
Total Revenue $37,837,443 $44,924,803 18.7%

Galveston College
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 % Increase
Tuition and fees $2,810,103 $2,614,011 -7.0%
State Funds $5,724,768 $6,146,448 7.4%
Local Fund $6,555,487 $8,234,235 25.6%
Other Revenue $3,957,946 $3,859,074 -2.5%
Total Revenue $19,048,304 $20,853,768 9.5%

Houston Community College System
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 % Increase
Tuition and fees $68,210,461 $83,093,303 21.8%
State Funds $76,641,509 $80,863,825 5.5%
Local Fund $82,580,297 $97,214,316 17.7%
Other Revenue $52,610,089 $56,373,462 7.2%
Total Revenue $280,042,356 $317,544,906 13.4%

Lee College
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 % Increase
Tuition and fees $7,486,371 $8,174,703 9.2%
State Funds $12,501,044 $13,690,714 9.5%
Local Fund $14,898,579 $18,687,122 25.4%
Other Revenue $10,404,396 $16,121,355 54.9%
Total Revenue $45,290,390 $56,673,894 25.1%

Lone Star College
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 % Increase
Tuition and fees $39,067,185 $50,902,449 30.3%
State Funds $54,696,754 $72,000,555 31.6%
Local Fund $86,951,108 $118,177,633 35.9%
Other Revenue $31,212,711 $36,885,779 18.2%
Total Revenue $211,927,758 $277,966,416 31.2%

San Jacinto College
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 % Increase
Tuition and fees $33,837,621 $39,029,590 15.3%
State Funds $43,905,833 $47,658,028 8.5%
Local Fund $42,072,751 $53,316,465 26.7%
Other Revenue $32,158,902 $34,715,863 8.0%
Total Revenue $151,975,107 $174,719,946 15.0%

Wharton County Junior College
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 % Increase
Tuition and fees $8,712,467 $12,362,228 41.9%
State Funds $10,461,569 $11,111,970 6.2%
Local Fund $3,422,695 $4,246,434 24.1%
Other Revenue $4,959,365 $6,746,097 36.0%
Total Revenue $27,556,096 $34,466,729 25.1%

Statewide
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 % Increase
Tuition and fees $789,296,695 $939,695,923 19.1%
State Funds $968,570,165 $1,104,926,800 14.1%
Local Fund $927,555,841 $1,213,303,270 30.8%
Other Revenue $855,379,261 $929,063,352 8.6%
Total Revenue $3,540,801,962 $4,186,989,345 18.2%

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Contact hours – the time a teacher actually spends in the classroom with students – for community, state and technical colleges rose by 25.5 percent statewide from fall 2000 to fall 2008. In the Gulf Coast region, contact hours at schools increased by varying amounts, ranging from 0.7 percent at Lee College to 54.4 percent in the Lone Star College System. (Exhibit 66).27

Educational achievement will play a vital and positive role in the Gulf Coast region’s economic future. But significant increases in enrollment at the majority of the region’s colleges and universities will place new demands on the region’s higher education infrastructure, requiring more instructors to keep pace with student needs.

In the Gulf Coast region, contact hours at schools increased by varying amounts, ranging from 0.7 percent at Lee College to 54.4 percent in the Lone Star College System.

Exhibit 66

Gulf Coast Region, Contact Hours at Community, State and Technical Colleges

Institution Fall 2000 Fall 2008 % Change
2000 to 2008
Alvin Community College 630,400 733,656 16.4%
Brazosport College 568,688 582,304 2.4%
College of the Mainland 581,344 606,848 4.4%
Galveston College 369,225 373,696 1.2%
Houston Community College System 5,240,288 6,009,500 14.7%
Lee College 974,160 980,928 0.7%
Lone Star College 3,824,984 5,907,320 54.4%
San Jacinto College 3,623,074 4,662,888 28.7%
Wharton County Junior College 870,984 1,065,984 22.4%
Public Community & Technical College
Statewide Total
73,370,630 92,048,303 25.5%

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.



Pin Oak Middle School, Bellair (SW Houston)

PHOTO: Houston Independent School District

Endnotes

All links were valid at the time of publication. Changes to web sites not maintained by the office of the Texas Comptroller may not be reflected in the links below.

Required Plug-ins