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Education

About 9.4 percent, or more than 435,000 of the state’s public elementary and secondary students, attend school in the Alamo region.

Education is the foundation for future economic growth. The fast pace of technological change dictates that the local population adapt and attain the skills necessary to attract and retain a wide array of employers and a diverse industrial mix. A well-educated and highly skilled work force is essential for successful competition in the global economy.

Public Education

Exhibit 42

Alamo Region, Ethnicity of Public School Students,
2001-02 and 2007-08 School Years

Ethnicity 2001-02 2007-08
White 33.5% 28.8%
Hispanic 57.9 61.4
Black 7.3 7.7
Asian/Pacific Islander 1.2 1.7
Native American 0.2 0.3

Totals may not equal 100 percent due to rounding.

Source: Texas Education Agency.

About 9.4 percent, or more than 435,000 of the state’s public elementary and secondary students, attend school in the Alamo region, which is home to 76 public school districts with 730 campuses, as well as 27 charter districts and their 56 campuses.

The region’s student population has risen steadily in recent years, growing by 12.7 percent from 2001-02 to the 2007-08 school year, for a net gain of nearly 49,000 students. The region’s total population rose by 12.4 percent over the same time period.

During 2007-08, the region’s largest independent school districts by enrollment were Northside ISD in Bexar County, with almost 86,000 students, and North East ISD, also in Bexar County, with nearly 62,000 students. The smallest districts were the Guardian Angel Performance Arts Academy in Bexar County, a charter school with just seven students, and Divide ISD in Kerr County, with 15 students.

Like the rest of the state, the Alamo region has seen its public school population become more Hispanic (Exhibit 42). But the region has a much larger share of Hispanic students than the state as a whole, at 61.4 percent versus 47.2 percent.2

Exhibit 43

2007-08 Accountability Ratings, Alamo School Districts

Rating Region Statewide
Exemplary 5.8% 3.5%
Recognized 24.3% 26.8%
Academically Acceptable 66.0% 66.6%
Academically Unacceptable 1.9% 2.6%
Not Rated: Other 1.9% 0.6%


Exhibit 44

2007-08 Accountability Ratings, Alamo School Campuses

Rating Region Statewide
Exemplary 10.6% 12.2%
Recognized 32.1% 34.4%
Academically Acceptable 43.5% 42.8%
Academically Unacceptable 1.1% 2.5%
Not Rated: Other 12.7% 8.1%

Note: “Not Rated: Other” includes campuses such as alternative education programs or early childhood education centers. These data include charter districts.
Numbers may not total due to rounding.

Source: Texas Education Agency.


The Alamo region also has seen an increase in its number of economically disadvantaged students. In 2001-02, more than 216,000 of its students, or 56 percent of total enrollment were identified as economically disadvantaged. In 2007-08, more than 249,000 students or 57.3 percent of the region’s students were classified in this way, slightly more than the statewide average of 55.3 percent.

Accountability

The Alamo region’s districts compared favorably with statewide averages in the 2007-08 district accountability ratings established by the Texas Education Agency (TEA). The region exceeded the state average for Exemplary ratings, and fell below the statewide average for districts deemed Academically Unacceptable (Exhibit 43).

In August 2008, TEA rated six of the region’s 103 districts as Exemplary; 25 as Recognized; 68 as Academically Acceptable; and two as Academically Unacceptable. Two districts were not rated.

The Alamo region also exceeded statewide averages in its number of campuses rated Academically Acceptable (Exhibit 44). A smaller percentage of its campuses were rated Academically Unacceptable than in the state as a whole.

Of the 786 campuses in the region’s districts, including charter schools, 83 were rated Exemplary; 252 were rated Recognized; 342 were Academically Acceptable; nine were Academically Unacceptable; and 100 were listed as “Not Rated: Other” in 2007-08.

Twenty of the region’s 27 charter districts were rated Academically Acceptable, while three were rated as Recognized and one as Exemplary. One charter district campus was rated Academically Unacceptable and two were “Not Rated: Other” in 2007-08.

In 2008, among the region’s districts that teach all grade levels, Falls City ISD in Karnes County had the highest percentage of students passing all Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) tests, at 96 percent. Randolph Field ISD in Bexar County had the next largest share, at 91 percent. (An average for the Alamo region is unavailable because TEA reports district data only as percentages.)

The Alamo region generated a substantially lower share of its school revenue from local taxes (40.8 percent) than the statewide average (45.8 percent).

Within the region, all graduating students in the Charlotte and Runge ISDs took college entrance exams in the 2007-08 school year, greatly outpacing the statewide average of 68.2 percent. Of the 82 Alamo region districts for which data are available, 23 had participation rates above the state average.

In 2007-08, Alamo Heights ISD had the highest percentage of test takers scoring at or above the criterion score used by TEA to measure college readiness, at 55.6 percent. Across the state, just 27 percent of students who took at least one of the tests scored at or above the criterion score.

In the 2006-07 school year, the most recent year for which dropout data is available, the Alamo region had a dropout rate of 4.2 percent, which was slightly higher than the statewide average of 3.9 percent.

Exhibit 45

Alamo Region and Statewide, 2007 High School Graduates

Graduation Plan Region Statewide
Distinguished Achievement 7.0% 10.8%
Recommended 69.1% 67.0%
Minimum/IEP* 23.8% 22.1%
Distinguished Achievement & Recommended as Percent of Total 76.1% 77.9%

Totals may not equal 100 percent due to rounding.

Source: Texas Education Agency.

Outcomes

In 2008, 81 percent of Alamo region residents above the age of 25 had a high school diploma, a General Educational Development (GED) certificate or some higher education, slightly above the statewide average of 75.7 percent.3

In the 2006-07 school year, 22,919 students graduated from the region’s public high schools, representing about 9.5 percent of the statewide total for that year. Northside ISD had the largest number of graduates with 4,300, while the Academy of Careers and Technologies in Bexar County and Nordheim ISD in DeWitt County had the smallest number, with just three graduates each.

About 7 percent of the region’s students graduated under the state’s most stringent graduation plan, the Distinguished Achievement plan; 69.1 percent under the Recommended plan, which is the required plan; and 23.8 percent under the Minimum plan, a less stringent graduation plan that requires both parental and school approval, or under an Individual Education Plan offered through Special Education (Exhibit 45).

School Finance

In the 2007-08 school year, the Alamo region’s total school spending per pupil, including debt service, averaged $10,750, about 5.8 percent more than the statewide average of $10,162. Twenty Alamo region districts spent more than 20 percent above the statewide average in that year. Another 59 districts, however, including the region’s charters, spent less per pupil than the statewide average.

Excluding charter districts and districts located on military bases, which do not receive funding from local taxes, the region’s lowest total tax rate in 2007 was that of Divide ISD, at 74.3 cents per $100 of property value. Floresville ISD levied the highest rate at $1.52. The statewide average was $1.19 per $100 of value, and in the region 39 districts exceeded it.

The Alamo region generated a substantially lower share of its school revenue from local taxes (40.8 percent) than the statewide average (45.8 percent). Hunt ISD received the largest portion of its school funding from local taxes (75 percent), while Edgewood ISD had the lowest share (11.3 percent). The region’s share of revenue from other local sources, such as equity transfers and tuition, was marginally lower than the state’s, at 6.5 versus 6.7 percent. The KIPP Aspire Academy gained 35.4 percent of its revenue from these other local sources, for the highest share in the region; Doss Consolidated School District received the lowest share for the region’s non-charter schools, at 1.2 percent.

Edgewood ISD had the lowest property wealth per pupil in 2007, at $75,178, while Divide ISD led the region with $3,155,900 per pupil. The regional average was $294,401, or 11.7 percent lower than the statewide average of $333,420.

The Texas school finance system requires districts with relatively high property wealth per pupil to share it with less-wealthy districts through a process called “equity transfers.” In 2007, 12 districts in the Alamo region transferred roughly $73.3 million, an average of $176 per pupil. Calhoun County ISD transferred the largest total amount ($26.9 million), while Ezzell ISD had the highest per-pupil transfer ($15,938).

Among the non-charter districts, Poteet ISD received the largest share of revenue from the state in 2007, at 71.5 percent. Hunt ISD received the smallest state share, at 9.4 percent. The regional average for 2007-08 was 41.8 percent, higher than the statewide average of 37.8 percent. The region derived a slightly larger share of its school funding from federal aid than the statewide average, at 11 percent versus 9.8 percent statewide.10

Exhibit 46

Alamo Region, Higher Education Campuses


see alternative

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.


View description of higher education campuses.


Teachers

In examining teacher salaries across the region, it should be remembered that average salaries vary with length of teacher tenure as well as wage levels. District A, for instance, may have a higher average salary than District B because it has a higher percentage of experienced teachers, even though its wage levels for various years of experience are lower than District B’s.

The average Alamo region teacher salary in 2007-08 was $983 above the statewide average of $46,178. Divide ISD had the highest average salary at $57,869.

Average salaries in the region rose by 14.5 percent from 2002-03 to 2007-08, compared with a statewide average rise of 15.5 percent for the same period. For charter schools, the San Antonio Can High School had the highest increase for this period at 53 percent. Divide ISD had the highest increase for non-charter schools at 30.3 percent.

The region’s teacher salaries accounted for more than 26 percent of total district expenditures from all funds in 2007-08, lower than the statewide average of 30.1 percent. Lighthouse Charter School devoted the highest share of total spending to teacher salaries, at 45.2 percent. Moulton ISD spent the highest share among the non-charter schools, at 42.2 percent. Sixty of the region’s districts devoted a smaller share of expenditures to teacher salaries than the statewide average.

In 2007-08, the Alamo region had a slightly higher number of students per teacher, at 15 versus a statewide average of 14.7. For charter schools, the Guardian Angel Performance Arts Academy had the lowest number of students per teacher, at 4.7. For non-charter schools, Nordheim ISD had the lowest ratio, at 5.6 students per teacher.11

Exhibit 47

Alamo Region, Higher Education Campuses

Institution City County
Coastal Bend College Pleasanton Center Pleasanton Atascosa
Alamo Colleges (Alamo CCD) –
  • Northeast Lakeview College
  • Northwest Vista College
  • Palo Alto College
  • St. Philip’s College
  • San Antonio College
San Antonio Bexar
Our Lady of the Lake University of San Antonio San Antonio Bexar
St. Mary’s University of San Antonio San Antonio Bexar
Texas A&M University-San Antonio
(formerly TAMU-Kingsville System Center at Palo Alto)
San Antonio Bexar
The University of Texas at San Antonio San Antonio Bexar
The University of Texas at San Antonio Teaching Site San Antonio Bexar
The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio San Antonio Bexar
Trinity University San Antonio Bexar
University of the Incarnate Word San Antonio Bexar
UTHSC at Houston School of Public Health Teaching Site San Antonio Bexar
Texas Tech University Teaching Site Fredericksburg Gillespie
Texas Lutheran University Seguin Guadalupe
Schreiner University Kerrville Kerr
University of Houston-Victoria Victoria Victoria
Victoria College, The Victoria Victoria

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Higher Education

The Alamo region has 16 institutions of higher education, including three university teaching sites and a health science center. Ten of these institutions are in Bexar County; this includes Texas A&M University-San Antonio, which became a stand-alone university in 2009. Six of the region’s 19 counties have higher education campuses or facilities (Exhibit 46).12

These campuses include five operated by the Alamo Community College District, called the Alamo Colleges (Exhibit 47).

Enrollment

In fall 2008, 108,057 students enrolled in the Alamo region’s higher public and private universities and colleges. Enrollment in four-year universities and colleges accounted for 45.7 percent of the total, with another 51.5 percent enrolled in the region’s community colleges. The remaining 3,060 students were at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) had 28,413 students enrolled in fall 2008, while 3,174 enrolled at the University of Houston-Victoria (UHV). UTSA’s enrollment has risen by 50.9 percent since fall 2000. Enrollment at UHV jumped by 86.9 percent in the same period, due in large part to expanded program offerings at off-campus locations as well as online. Both greatly exceeded the statewide public university enrollment growth rate of 22.8 percent.

The region’s enrollment in two-year higher education programs rose from 42,823 in 2000 to 55,617 in 2008, a 29.9 percent increase. That pace lagged somewhat behind the statewide two-year enrollment growth rate of 38.2 percent.

In all, the region’s higher education enrollment increased by 31.7 percent (Exhibit 48).25

Exhibit 48

Alamo Region, Fall Headcount Enrollment 2000 and 2008

Public Institutions Fall 2000 Enrollment Fall 2008 Enrollment Enrollment Change Percent
Change
The University of Texas at San Antonio 18,830 28,413 9,583 50.9%
University of Houston-Victoria 1,698 3,174 1,476 86.9%
Regional Total – Public Universities 20,528 31,587 11,059 53.9%
Statewide Total – Public Universities 414,626 509,136 94,510 22.8%
Alamo Colleges (Alamo CCD) 38,802 51,641 12,839 33.1%
The Victoria College 4,021 3,976 -45 -1.1%
Regional Total – Two-year Public Colleges 42,823 55,617 12,794 29.9%
Statewide Total – Two-year Public Colleges 431,934 597,146 165,212 38.2%
Private Institutions Fall 2000 Enrollment Fall 2008 Enrollment Enrollment Change Percent
Change
Our Lady of the Lake University of San Antonio 3,474 2,642 -832 -23.9%
St. Mary’s University of San Antonio 4,137 3,868 -269 -6.5%
Schreiner University 776 974 198 25.5%
Texas Lutheran University 1,460 1,432 -28 -1.9%
Trinity University 2,620 2,588 -32 -1.2%
University of the Incarnate Word 3,702 6,289 2,587 69.9%
Regional Total – Private Universities 16,169 17,793 1,624 10.0%
Statewide Total – Private Universities 107,681 115,048 7,367 6.8%
Health-Related Institutions Fall 2000 Enrollment Fall 2008 Enrollment Enrollment Change Percent
Change
UT Health Science Center at San Antonio 2,543 3,060 517 20.3%
Regional Total – Health-Related Institutions 2,543 3,060 517 20.3%
Statewide Total – Health-Related Institutions 12,607 17,692 5,085 40.3%
Totals Fall 2000 Enrollment Fall 2008 Enrollment Enrollment Change Percent
Change
Regional Total – Two-Year Institutions 42,823 55,617 12,794 29.9%
Statewide Total – Four-Year Institutions 36,697 49,380 12,683 34.6%
Regional Total Higher Education 82,063 108,057 25,994 31.7%

Note: Regional data do not include enrollment for branch campuses located in the Alamo region that are part of a main campus located in another region, since they are not reported separately to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.
Separate data for Texas A&M-San Antonio is not included because it was part of Texas A&M University-Kingsville until 2009.

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.


Since fall 2000, the University of Texas at San Antonio’s enrollment has risen by 50.9 percent, and the University of Houston-Victoria’s has increased by 86.9 percent.


Exhibit 49

Alamo Region Public Universities , Four- and Six-Year Graduation Rates (First-Time, Full-Time, Degree-Seeking Students)

Institution Fiscal 1999 4-year Fiscal 1999 6-year Fiscal 2007 4-year Fiscal 2007 6-year
University of Texas at San Antonio 7.2% 35.1% 14.2% 40.3%
Statewide Average 18.0% 49.2% 25.3% 56.3%

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Exhibit 50

Alamo Region Community Colleges, Three- and Six-Year Graduation Rates, (First-time, Full-time, Credential-Seeking Students)

Institution Fiscal 2000
3-year
Fiscal 2000
6-year
Fiscal 2007
3-year
Fiscal 2007
6-year
Alamo Colleges (Alamo CCD) 4.2% 15.3% 5.9% 20.5%
The Victoria College 30.3% 61.4% 24.7% 44.3%
Statewide Average 10.8% 25.7% 11.1% 30.8%

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.



Exhibit 51

Alamo Region Public Universities, Degrees Awarded, Fiscal 2000 and 2008

Institution Fiscal 2000 Fiscal 2008 Change Percent Change
University of Texas at San Antonio 3,107 4,591 1,484 47.8%
University of Houston-Victoria 351 704 353 100.6%
Statewide Total 78,954 106,582 27,628 35.0%

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.



Exhibit 52

Alamo Region Two-Year Colleges, Degrees and Certificates Awarded,
Fiscal 2000 and 2008

Institution Fiscal 2000 Fiscal 2008 Change Percent Change
Alamo Colleges (Alamo CCD) 1,938 3,736 1,798 92.8%
The Victoria College 461 475 14 3.0%
Statewide 37,395 55,809 18,414 49.2%

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Accessibility

The University of Texas at San Antonio accepted 82.6 percent of its first-time undergraduate applicants for the fall 2008 semester, more than the statewide average of 74.4 percent. About 13.7 percent of the 10,949 applicants accepted at UTSA were accepted because they were in the top 10 percent of their high school graduating class, compared to 21.8 percent of accepted applicants statewide.26 The University of Houston-Victoria’s acceptance rates are not reported separately to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Outcomes

Because some degrees require more than four years of study, and because some students may need more time to graduate, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) compares four-year and six-year graduation rates to measure university outcomes. Graduation rates improved significantly between fiscal 1999 and fiscal 2007 at UTSA, with its four-year rate nearly doubling and the six-year rate rising by 5.2 percent (Exhibit 49).

Because many community college students go on to a university to obtain a four-year degree, THECB also compares three-year and six-year graduation rates to measure community college outcomes.

The Alamo Colleges’ three- and six-year graduation rates from fiscal 2000 to fiscal 2007 rose slightly, by 1.7 percent and 5.2 percent, respectively. These rates, however, still lag behind the statewide averages. The Victoria College’s three- and six-year graduation rates, by contrast, were much higher than statewide averages in both 2000 and 2007. Its three- and six-year graduation rates fell between 2000 and 2007, however, by 5.6 percent and 17.1 percent respectively (Exhibit 50).

From fiscal 2000 to 2008, UTSA’s number of degrees awarded rose by nearly 48 percent, to 4,591, while the University of Houston-Victoria, with a much smaller student body, doubled its number of degrees awarded. The statewide average increase was 35 percent (Exhibit 51).

Over the same period, the number of degrees and certificates awarded by all Texas community colleges rose by 49.2 percent. In the Alamo region, The Victoria College, with nearly unchanged enrollment, increased its numbers of degrees and certificates awarded by 3 percent. The Alamo Colleges saw a sharp increase in degrees awarded; at 92.8 percent, their results nearly doubled the statewide growth rate (Exhibit 52).28

Affordability

From 2002-03 to 2008-09, the estimated costs of resident tuition and fees at both public universities in the Alamo region rose sharply, as they generally did statewide. The increase in costs for resident students, however, was not quite as steep at UHV and was higher than average at UTSA. The Alamo region universities’ percent increase in total costs was within less than five percentage points on either side of the state average (Exhibit 53).

Exhibit 53

Alamo Region, College Costs

Public Universities
Institution Resident Tuition and Fees 2002-03 Resident Tuition and Fees 2008-09 Dollar Change 2002-03 to 2008-09 Percent Change 2002-03 to 2008-09 Resident Total Costs 2002-03 Resident Total Costs 2008-09 Percent Change 2002-03 to 2008-09
University of Texas at San Antonio $3,598 $7,666 $4,068 113.1% $14,520 $21,096 45.3%
University of Houston-Victoria $2,835 $5,220 $2,385 84.1% $13,035 $17,816 36.7%
Statewide Average $3,441 $6,193 $2,752 80.0% $13,047 $18,389 40.9%
Public Community Colleges
Institution Resident Tuition and Fees 2002-03 Resident Tuition and Fees 2008-09 Dollar Change 2002-03 to 2008-09 Percent Change 2002-03 to 2008-09 Resident Total Costs 2002-03 Resident Total Costs 2008-09 Percent Change 2002-03 to 2008-09
Alamo Colleges
(Alamo CCD)
$1,173 $1,832 $659 56.2% $11,636 $15,038 29.2%
The Victoria College $996 $1,618 $622 62.4% $7,174 $12,270 71.0%
Statewide Average $1,120 $1,795 $675 60.3% $9,248 $12,510 35.3%
Private Institutions
Institution Resident Tuition and Fees 2002-03 Resident Tuition and Fees 2008-09 Dollar Change 2002-03 to 2008-09 Percent Change 2002-03 to 2008-09 Resident Total Costs 2002-03 Resident Total Costs 2008-09 Percent Change 2002-03 to 2008-09
Our Lady of the Lake University of San Antonio $12,964 $20,232 $7,268 56.1% $21,510 $27,732 28.9%
St. Mary’s University of San Antonio $13,480 $21,156 $7,676 56.9% $21,615 $30,000 38.8%
Schreiner University $12,318 $17,992 $5,674 46.1% $23,998 $27,802 15.9%
Texas Lutheran University $16,925 $20,970 $4,045 23.9% $22,535 $29,810 32.3%
Trinity University $16,554 $26,834 $10,280 62.1% $23,672 $34,752 46.8%
University of the
Incarnate Word
$13,498 $20,260 $6,762 50.1% $21,648 $29,380 35.7%
Statewide Average $11,190 $18,625 $7,435 66.4% $19,434 $29,859 53.6%

Note: Resident total costs include tuition and fees, books and supplies, room and board, transportation and personal expenses.
Separate data for Texas A&M-San Antonio is not included because it was part of Texas A&M University-Kingsville until 2009.

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Exhibit 54

Alamo Region, Public Universities Total Revenue Sources,
Fiscal 2006 and Fiscal 2008

University of Texas at San Antonio
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 Percent Increase
Tuition and fees $110,609,769 $138,738,892 25.4%
State appropriations $108,073,695 $126,224,393 16.8%
Federal funds $60,454,600 $64,492,971 6.7%
Institutional funds $20,717,983 $31,972,518 54.3%
Total Revenue $299,856,047 $361,428,774 20.5%
University of Houston-Victoria
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 Percent Increase
Tuition and fees $7,118,295 $10,456,539 46.9%
State appropriations $14,436,939 $19,751,198 36.8%
Federal funds $1,727,346 $2,280,124 32.0%
Institutional funds $10,361,542 $9,494,679 -8.4%
Total Revenue $33,644,122 $41,982,540 24.8%
Statewide
Revenue Source Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2008 % Increase
Tuition and fees $2,000,693,293 $2,400,749,604 20.0%
State appropriations $2,599,091,546 $2,949,486,914 13.5%
Federal funds $1,161,122,338 $1,260,930,090 8.6%
Institutional funds $1,375,219,819 $1,638,009,659 19.1%
Total Revenue $7,136,126,996 $8,249,176,267 15.6%

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

At the community college level, tuition and fees at the region’s schools rose between 2002-03 and 2008-09, but less than the $675 statewide average cost hike. The total resident student cost for the 2008-09 academic year was about the same at The Victoria College as for the average Texas community college; the Alamo Colleges’ total costs were higher than the statewide average, although their tuition and fees were about average.29

The cost of the region’s private universities has varied somewhat in comparison to the statewide average. For 2002-03, estimated tuition and fee costs for the region’s private universities were higher than the statewide average and, except at Schreiner University, this was also true in 2008-09. Total costs for a resident student in 2008, however, were lower or roughly the same as the state average, except at Trinity University.30

Funding

The statewide average for public universities’ total revenue, including tuition and fees, general revenue appropriations, federal funds and institutional funds, rose by 15.6 percent from fiscal 2006 to fiscal 2008. In the Alamo region, both public universities saw larger rates of increase in revenues, with UHV’s increase more than half again as high at 24.8 percent. UTSA saw its revenues grow by 20.5 percent during the same period (Exhibit 54).31

Total state appropriations for community colleges fell in the 2004-05 biennium, as they did for the Alamo region’s community colleges. By the 2008-09 biennium, however, statewide community college appropriations, and the Alamo Colleges’ amount, had recovered the loss. The Victoria College, however, did not have a similar rebound in its appropriations, and from 2002-03 to 2008-09 the college saw a 12.1 percent decrease in state general revenue funding (Exhibit 55).33

Exhibit 55

Alamo Region, General Revenue Appropriations,
Public Community and Technical Colleges, Fiscal 2002-2009

Institution 2002-03 Biennium 2004-05 Biennium 2006-07 Biennium 2008-09 Biennium Percent Change
2002-03 to 2008-09
Alamo Colleges (Alamo CCD) $120,311,432 $115,564,930 $130,737,272 $135,693,392 12.8%
The Victoria College $15,166,180 $13,690,643 $13,618,232 $13,328,426 -12.1%
Public Community & Technical College Statewide Total $1,709,158,821 $1,622,914,188 $1,763,151,222 $1,845,292,200 8.0%

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Contact hours – the time a professor actually spends in the classroom with students – for community, state and technical colleges rose by 25.5 percent statewide from fall 2000 to fall 2008. In the Alamo region, contact hours at the Alamo Colleges reflected their increased enrollment, with a 34.1 percent growth rate. The Victoria College had a drop in contact hours over the period (Exhibit 56).34

Exhibit 56

Alamo Region, Community, State and Technical Colleges,
Contact Hours Fall 2000 and Fall 2008

Institution Fall 2000 Fall 2008 Percent Change
2000 to 2008
Alamo Colleges (Alamo CCD) 6,142,544 8,239,264 34.1%
The Victoria College 707,248 643,792 -9.0%
Public Community & Technical College Statewide Total 73,370,630 92,048,303 25.5%

Note: Contact hours include only those with a full or part-time faculty instructing by lecture, lab or practicum. Classes taught at an inter-institutional location are excluded.

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Contact hours at the Alamo Colleges reflected their increased enrollment, with a 34.1 percent growth rate.

Educational achievement will play a vital and positive role in the Alamo region’s economic future. Significant increases in enrollment at the majority of the region’s colleges and universities will place new demands on the region’s higher education infrastructure, requiring more instructors to keep pace with student needs.


University of Houston-Victoria

PHOTO: University of Houston-Victoria

Endnotes

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