Skip to content
Quick Start for:
Open Enrollment,

Better Grades in Ysleta ISD

Back to
Bordering the Future

In 1993, just after joining the Ysleta Independent School District (YISD) as superintendent, Anthony Trujillo said he wanted students to be able to go to any school in the district as long as space was available. This was before the state implemented its accountability system and "low-performance" rating became an issue.

Trujillo knew the condition of the district's schools and believed an open enrollment policy could prompt healthy competition among campuses, while eliminating the need for parents to claim residency with relatives to place their children in the schools they preferred.

Under the open enrollment policy, schools that did not offer the services or assistance their students needed soon saw students exercising their option to move. This competition among individual schools, along with the superintendent's intense emphasis on student performance, had dramatic results. In 1993, the first year of the state's accountability system, YISD had seven low-performing campuses. The district did not keep comprehensive records concerning internal transfers at that time, but school officials estimate that nearly 3,000 students exercised their right to switch schools that year.

The following year, YISD had no low-performing schools and one school rated as "recognized." By the 1994 school year, eight schools were recognized. In the 1995 school year, 15 schools were recognized, and the following school year brought an "exemplary" rating, and 22 schools were recognized. In the past three years, not a single internal transfer request was based solely on a school's performance ratings, an understandable fact considering that nearly every school in the district is showing dramatic improvement.

Back to
Bordering the Future